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Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 12:52 am
by PeterH
Aaah, the difficult third layout. A number of more ambitious false starts convinced me that I should keep it small. And RMWeb’s cakebox challenge makes me to do that: the maximum size is 200 x 200 x 150 mm.

This of course is yet another Simplicity Sidings clone, I didn’t make one earlier, and is much influenced by Robin’s version, again with pictures here: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=10782.

So, here’s my mock-up in corrugated cardboard and hot glue. I’d appreciate any comments and suggestions.

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Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 1:10 pm
by MickT
Excellent!

I think it would make a good "additional entry" absolutely as it is, as it prompts motivation and is a very neat model in its own right! Well done that man!

Mick

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 5:57 pm
by chris stockdale
Cardboard mock ups are great fun and so cheap.

A suggestion if I may: add a door space to the right of the loading bay with the steps incorporated into that. The loading bank should then be 'all of a piece' and large enough to have a couple of wagons being serviced at any one time.

Cheers,

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Sun Nov 19, 2017 6:42 pm
by PeterH
Thanks for the suggestion Chris.

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 2:33 am
by PeterH
Another mock-up. This is like eating potato chips (that’s ‘crisps’ in imperial units). I followed Stockers’ suggestion to make the ‘usable’ part of the loading platform longer, to fit 2 wagons. I didn’t want to put a door in the building face to the right of the platform, so I ran the steps along the tracks:

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Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 6:12 am
by chris stockdale
That’s a neat solution.

It’s amazing what can be fitted into a tiny area. :D

Cheers,

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Mon Nov 20, 2017 7:13 am
by michael
I like your solution Peter, it looks less cluttered, architecturally.

Michael

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Sat Nov 25, 2017 4:18 am
by PeterH
Something real. My fear of commitment means that it wood screws together, so I can take it apart to paint. And fiddle with.

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Ply base, foamboard building. The wall and fence on the left is two layers of 1.5 mm card, with skins of thin aluminium (from offset printing plates), with a final layer of paper on the inside, so I can stick things to it with PVA glue. All glued with polyurethane glue. This glue doesn’t have ‘grip’ like PVA glue does, so I found the layers tended to slew around when I pressed them together. I had to have an alignment pin in 2 corners. The result is really strong. I’ve been wanting to try this for a while.

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Fri Dec 01, 2017 8:22 am
by PeterH
Bricks happen. Inspired by Andi’s houses. It is a more recent style, with the concrete reinforcing, which calls for tidy bricklaying. Perhaps I should have modelled an earlier period.

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Sat Dec 02, 2017 4:07 am
by michael
I have done brickwork this way, so I gnow how much work you have set yourself up for.

Michael

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 6:18 am
by PeterH
Bricks are done, a bit of a struggle. There seem to be two ways to finish bricks:

1 - Paint the bricks, then apply the ‘mortar’. The problem is that you can’t then change the brick colour much.

2 - Apply the ‘mortar’, then paint the bricks. The problem is how avoid getting brick colour on the mortar.

I did the second, reasoning that I might need to fiddle with the brick colour. My test piece worked well, but on my real piece the sparkle filler I used for mortar hardened too fast, and I couldn’t remove enough from the lines between the bricks. So brick paint got on the mortar and I had to scrape it out. And some of the bricks revealed their true soggy cardboard natures.

Next time I’ll use thinner bricks, maybe shellac them to make them a bit tougher and use watery mortar so it doesn’t fill the lines between the bricks.

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Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:20 pm
by docnjoj
Those bricks look pretty darn good to me. Nice job in spite of the problems.
otherDoc

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 1:26 pm
by mad gerald
G'day,

To apply joint mortar into the joints at first I tried to sweep it in, using a paint brush (and the mortar to be fixed it with a layer of clear varnish when applied) - which did not work quite proper, especially because the mortar powder stuck too much to the surface of the bricks - or would not stay in the joints.

I then applied diluted PVAC glue with a paint brush into the joints, scattered the mortar all over it, removing the surplus of mortar with a bristle brush and a damp tissue. Artist water colour began to dissolve immediately and turned into a mess, the acrylic colour (even not protected by a layer of clear varnish yet) worked by far better:

Image

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 7:20 pm
by PeterH
Thanks Doc and Gerald.

Gerald: your bricks look just like I wanted to achieve - subtle colour and the grout looks perfect. I looked on your website where you describe making them and will try what you have done. You used grout for the mortar, is that the grout that people use to fill the joins between tiles in bathrooms and kitchens?

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 05, 2017 7:32 pm
by mad gerald
PeterH wrote:You used grout for the mortar, is that the grout that people use to fill the joins between tiles in bathrooms and kitchens?

Yes, standard quality grout, available at DIY-shops.

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 5:53 pm
by PeterH
Thanks Gerald

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 8:06 pm
by mad gerald
Good luck!

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Fri Dec 22, 2017 10:55 pm
by PeterH
Now inset track in concrete. I filled round the track with foamboard and card, then used lightweight filler/spackle to fill in the sleepers.n. Next time I’ll use plywood, because sanding the filler was tedious and the foam/card got messed up when I had to chisel off the ‘concrete’ above. Twice.
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This is the filler I used:
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Then a layer of aggregate, woodland scenic fine light grey ballast in filler with about 20% PVA to make it more spreadable. Most of the aggregate got hidden by the filler; next time I’ll use less filler and more PVA and maybe gesso.

Then the plaster/render (filler with about 20% Liquitex light modelling paste) smeared on fairly thick in 2 layers, aiming for about 90% coverage.

Finally very thin washes of acrylic ink, much diluted with water: black then yellow ochre.

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Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Sun Dec 24, 2017 9:53 pm
by PeterH
I finally figured out how to make a good-enough concrete plaster/render on a wall:

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There are lots of stages but it’s fairly quick. I use a 65 mm scraper from a builders supply shop to apply the filler.

1 - Apply a thin layer of house filler to get rid of the flat look and round off the internal corners. I used Sellys patchfiller, made for filling cracks in houses. Don’t try for a perfect finish. Sand a bit when dry.

2 - Use a balled up cloth to stamp on gesso coloured dark grey with black acrylic ink, over about 50% of the wall, in the corners and at random. This goes on a bit rough but gets smoother as it dries.

3 - Repeat step 2 with mid grey plus a bit of yellow (yellow ochre). Cover 90%.

4 - Repeat step 2 with very light grey plus yellow. Cover 40% in big patches.

5 - Now the key step: make up a mix of Rapid filler (post above) plus 30% liqiitex light modelling paste. Spread it thinly over the building. I’m not an expert at filling, so in most places it is as thin as possible and in a few places a bit thicker and none at all in a couple of places. And in some places it gets rough if I work it too much. Perfect.

This thin layer of filler is almost transparent, so it diffuses the paint below and it doesn’t look like paint anymore. Plus it gives some texture.

6 - If needed, brush on thin washes of acrylic ink in water to get the colour right.

7 - Finally a thin wash of acrylic ink black.

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Mon Dec 25, 2017 10:25 am
by mad gerald
Looks promising, Peter ... and a nice SBS as well!

Any progress on the brickwork too?

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 26, 2017 3:33 am
by PeterH
Aaah, bricks. The little wall of bricks I made here was to try modelling bricks. I probably won’t repeat it or take it further:

1 - The buildings in New Zealand that I want to model seem to be the Art Decoish buildings made between 1930 and 1950, which inevitably are finished with plaster/render. And maybe painted. So I want to concentrate on modelling those finishes.

2 - I found it too hard to model bricks, particularly I missed being able to change the colour much after the mortar is in place.

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 26, 2017 1:35 pm
by Gnu Bee
For a long time I have wondered whether it is worth trying to reproduce bricks as individual items with mortar between. I think that from the distances we view models, even at 1:24, brickwork looks pretty flat. I saw an advert for a brick stencil the other day which gives a 1mm recess between bricks. This would mean that the pointing is an inch deep and probably as wide. Seeing as most bricks are laid with at most half inch high mortar a 1 inch deep pointing would be very worn indeed. I do think that the best way to represent brick is brick paper even at this scale or painting a representation.
My photo is a real building in Italy - render and stone on the left, painted stonework on the right. Even at 1:1 this works!

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 26, 2017 6:29 pm
by PeterH
Good point Geoff.

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 26, 2017 7:08 pm
by KEG
Google for trompe oeil and find things like this: https://www.roadsideamerica.com/tip/43511

Have Fun

Juergen

Re: Eaton Hall & Co cakebox layout

Posted: Tue Dec 26, 2017 8:34 pm
by PeterH
Nice bridge KEG.

So I downloaded some paperbrick.co.uk:
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And here’s my hand laid effort again:
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The paperbrick looks much more like the well-laid brick of the era I’m modelling. And it blends into the background of the model better than my bricks do.

There’s something not quite right with the paperbrick mortar - it’s a bit too regular. And the whole thing is too even from top to bottom and side to side. But a trip through Affinity Photo will fix that, and make the bricks the right size and add the header bricks over the window. I can always scribe a few mortar lines if I want some texture. Quickbricks.

Though I have to say that my partner prefers my hand laid bricks. And Gerald’s bricks (earlier post) are best of all. Thanks for the reminder Geoff.