Stackpole

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

Moderator: GnATTERbox Moderators

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Stackpole

Postby dijon » Mon Jan 21, 2019 3:13 pm

I'm new here, I hope this works!

Stackpole

From time to time I get tempted away into “little distractions”. Some, such as Billy Spanners’ Garage and Y Cob-Bach, can be incorporated into the railway, some are heretical and many are irrelevant. Rhyd having hit an impasse for the moment with a solution reminiscent to trying to row across a river with a fox, a chicken and a sack if grain my mind wandered.

I have long been attracted to the Minimum Gauge Railways of Sir Arthur Heywood and my first Gn15 model (although I did not know it by that name then) was built over 26 years ago. It is an itch that has long needed scratching.

So the Stackpole project was born. Hopefully a series of linkable dioramas that will be developed as and when. But first a little reality.

Stackpole Estate
ImageSTACKPOLETIMELINE by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
The Palladian spender of Stackpole Court in its heyday.

The Stackpole Estate is about three miles south-west of Pembroke, on the south coast of the Angle Peninsula. It was a huge estate for the area, over 15,000 acres at its maximum.

Elizabeth Lort was the heiress of the Stackpole Estate and she married Alexander Campbell of Cawdor in 1689. The Campbells built the early Georgian mansion of Stackpole Court in the Palladian style in the 1730s on the site of the earlier fortified house.

Sir John Campbell II inherited the estate in 1777 and began landscaping work on a grand scale. What was once a valley was later flooded to create the Bosherston Lakes, as part of a designed landscape, and thousands of trees were planted.

It was a grand place in the ownership of a rich and influential family.

In my version of reality the sixth Sir John was very friendly with the Duke of Westminster who introduced him to, and to the works of, Sir Arthur Heywood. Sir John’s plans were to build, essentially two, but connected, railways: one entirely functional, connecting Stackpole Quay, the village, the Court, the Walled Garden and Home Farm, the other for the convenience of shooting guests – taking them from the Court out to St Govan’s Head and the shoots out beyond Castlemartin.

Imagerailwayline by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
A “working” map of the system, the westward line across the shoot would have carried on for another four miles or so.

Back to reality, two World Wars heralded a century of decline at Stackpole. Half of the estate, around 6,000 acres, was requisitioned by the Ministry of Defence to form Castlemartin Range in 1938. Soldiers billeted in Stackpole Court caused devastating damage to the house by stripping lead from the roof, causing dry and wet rot. Sadly, the house was finally demolished in 1963 to avoid death duties. In 1976 what was left of this historic estate was broken up and the farms were sold. Thankfully the coast, woods and lakes passed to the National Trust and were saved.

8 Arch Bridge

ImageStackpole-Estate-1957 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
The eight arch bridge at Stackpole, it is across here that this bit of imaginary line is running.

I just wanted a setting for me to photograph models as they emerge so this is not really a diorama or even a photo-plank – just a set.

As a base I used the back of a MFI type drawer. The only 16.5mm track I had was a length of PECO 00 so I cut away every other sleeper – they are far too small for 1/24th scale – I used Evo-stick to fix this and built up the road base either side with 3mm foam sheet (fixed with UHU Por).

When this was dry the roadway was covered with Redutex 7mm scale weather grey paving and the edges touched in with a grey Promarker to get rid of the stark white edge. The track was dressed with PECO coarse grey ballast fixed with Ballast Bind and put to one-side to dry for a couple of days.

ImageStaBas01 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageStaBas02 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Meanwhile the wall was constructed. This was cut from the hardboard drawer bottom, so fitted neatly into the slot in the drawer side. This was backed with 10mm bluefoam and covered with Noch textured Granite Stone paper. The cap stones were cut individual from blue foam and then painted to match and when dry the ensemble was sprayed with Dullcoate.

ImageStaBas03 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageStaBas04 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageStaBas05 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageStaBas06 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Finally, for now, a couple of Smallbrook wagons posed on the bridge, grass, weed and backscene to come!

ImageStaBas07 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Cheers

TrainsOnArran
True GnATTERbox
True GnATTERbox
Posts: 45
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2019 8:17 pm
Location: Isle of Arran

Re: Stackpole

Postby TrainsOnArran » Mon Jan 21, 2019 5:47 pm

As a recent convert to Gn15 and estate railways (see Cordale Hall Railway), I’m looking forward to seeing your dioramas develop.

Please keep posting pictures.
Paul

User avatar
PeterH
Seasoned Campaigner
Seasoned Campaigner
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2008 6:54 am
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: Railway history, drinking beer

Re: Stackpole

Postby PeterH » Mon Jan 21, 2019 8:48 pm

Nice work. If you model those cannons you can more than scratch your itch.
Peter

User avatar
chris stockdale
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 1247
Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2003 9:44 am
Location: Market Drayton, Shropshire, UK
Interests: most things narrow gauge, model or full size, especially 7 1/4" 'minimal' (which is sub Heywood ride on)

Re: Stackpole

Postby chris stockdale » Tue Jan 22, 2019 10:33 am

Hi,

For the past ten or so years we have rented a cottage near Strumble Head and we’ve visited Stackpole several times. Once we were lucky enough to see an otter in the lily ponds.

Since much of the path around the ponds is level I’ve often thought that a narrow gauge line could (should?) have been part of the estate.

Looking forward to seeing the diorames develop.

Cheers,

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Wed Jan 23, 2019 12:03 pm

Thanks to a follower's early intervention the wall has now been rebuilt with all stones the right-way-up as shown in this photo taken by a recent tourist!

ImageIMG_4007 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Thanks for the comments - and particularly tp Neil.

Cheers

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Thu Jan 24, 2019 3:04 pm

Letting the Grass Grow

Now the wall has been rebuilt I have been getting on with the base layer of grass. I am looking for a well kept but not immaculate standard of grounds maintenance – there were an awful lot of grounds to maintain! This 18th Century engraving of the 8 Arch Bridge should show what I mean.
Image8Arch18thC by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
I got this far with my Greenescene static grass machine, meaning to add a few blades of taller grass and some leaves when ...
ImageIMG_4015 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4018 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4020 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... the backscene arrived.

Now, this had been sent off to John at ID Backscenes as a black and white JPEG file and it arrived back the right size and in full colour: I reckon magic was involved. So I had to stop what I was doing and play with the backscene – and here we are.
ImageIMG_4013 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4012 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Very many thanks to John - info@art-printers.com

Cheers

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Tue Jan 29, 2019 10:54 am

Steam arrives at Stackpole

The Campbells of Cawdor had long been supporters of railway development, John, the First Earl, was involved in the building of his first railway in 1828, from the Llangennech Coal Company mines to the coast near Llanelly.. Fredrick, Lord Emlyn, he succeeded his father in 1898 to become the 3rd Earl) was the Chairman of the GWR from 1895 to 1905

In my version, with all his interests and contacts in railways, and having seen the estate railway of his friend the Duke of Westminster at Eaton Hall, he built his own, grander, railway at Stackpole.

He was succeeded by his eldest son, Hugh Frederick Vaughan Campbell, who changed the family residence to Cawdor Castle in Nairnshire and Golden Grove in Carmarthenshire.

Back to the make believe, Hugh’s younger brother, John, remained at Stackpole, both to run their interests in west Wales and to keep the Estate for the various family visits.

John had inherited his father’s love of railways and took great delight in the running of the Stackpole Railway to the principles of Sir Arthur Heywood, his guide and mentor who he met during the building of his father’s railway.

ImageIMG_4042 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

ImageIMG_4044 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Here we see JESSICA, transferred from Berger Hall, undergoing trials across the 8 Arch Bridge, in the Stackpole Railway.

Thanks Bill

Cheers

User avatar
PeterH
Seasoned Campaigner
Seasoned Campaigner
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2008 6:54 am
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: Railway history, drinking beer

Re: Stackpole

Postby PeterH » Tue Jan 29, 2019 8:23 pm

Good to see some motive power. What is the original of the photo in the backscene? Did the printer hand colour it to turn it from black and white to colour?
Peter

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Wed Jan 30, 2019 9:50 am

The backscene original I found in a photographic archuve. I would guess John (ID Backscenes) coloured it using some digital wizardry as he sent me three copies, but exactky what or how I don't know.

Cheers

David

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Fri Feb 01, 2019 12:18 pm

The Decauville Coach

Thanks for all the likes and comments. I’m learning as much as you! Before we start on the coach, the 8 Arch Bridge base is finished with grass and weeds added.
ImageIMG_4069 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Many years ago I drew up a Decauville 4w coach; in fact I made a 16mm model. Unfortunately I can find neither the original drawing nor photos of that model.
ImageDecCoach by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

And I wanted one for the Stackpole Railway. The obvious starting point was the Smallbrooj Studios kit ( http://smallbrookstudio.co.uk/kits-part ... h/11151500).

To the resin chassis I added a wooden floor ...
ImageIMG_4047 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... followed by angle irons along the sides.
ImageIMG_4051 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The ends had been sprayed and glazing fitted before being fixed to the chassis. I to better position the roof I added angle strips to the inside of the roof end beams ...
ImageIMG_4063 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

. unfortunately this had the effect of splaying the ends ...
ImageIMG_4062 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... if I was to do it again I would pack out the floor with 40thou plasticard at each end. Live and learn. I removed the angles and just glued the roof in place.
I made up, and narrowed, a pair of Phoenix Castings 1/24th Garden Benches ...
ImageIMG_4071 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... which were sprayed the main body colour.
ImageIMG_4081 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
To be continued ...
ImageIMG_4083 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

(Is that chimney wonky or is it just the photograph? I’ll go and check that!)
Cheers

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Sat Feb 02, 2019 1:16 pm

Two things from yesterday were annoying me. So the wonky chimney is sorted and we seem to be must free. Although I have no idea wha,t or how, the fogginess appeared. I can’t believe the iPhone could be affected by internal condensation and there was nothing on the lens – but it was bloody cold in the workshop compared to the house, where the phone had been overnight. So was that it?

ImageIMG_4087 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4090 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
Still, all’s well now.

Cheers

David

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Wed Feb 06, 2019 3:23 pm

The Boat Train
Image3rdEarl by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
[i ]The 3rd Earl of Cawdor[/i]

We have seen the 3ed Earl Cawdor was a railway supporter and enthusiast. Indeed, during his tenure as Chairman of the GWR he, personally, bought the Refreshment Rooms at Swindon so he could relieve the Company of its obligation to stop all trains for a 10 minute refreshment stop. Thus speeding up the rail service between London, Bristol, Cardiff and places beyond. The GWR recognised him by naming a locomotive “Earl of Cawdor”.
Image3297 Earl Cawdor, Westbourne Park, 1903 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

His enthusiasm (in my world) also led to the development of his own railway at the Stackpole Estate, as both a functioning transport system within the Estate and an amusement for visitors on shooting or scenic trips. The original intention was to connect the Estate to the GWR Tenby and Pembroke line at Lamphey but the First World War intervened and the rapid development of road transport finally killed off the idea.

His second son, John Pryce Vaughan Campbell, very much brought up as the “Spare “ rather than the “Heir”, took a personal interest in the development of the railway but was not beyond teasing his eminent father. The Earl had a passion for sailing and maintained at yacht, the Speedwhitch, at Stackpole Quay. So John Pryce decided to give his father a Boat Train.
A suitable design was found in the catalogue of the French manufacturer, Decauville et Fils, ...
ImageDecauville Coach by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... from which the Estate workshops built this ...
ImageIMG_4100 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

... and here it is , in The Boat Train, running out towards Linney Head.
ImageIMG_4109 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4110 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4112 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Cheers

David

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Mon Feb 18, 2019 12:51 pm

Just another break in the wall.

I have always liked Heywood’s 4w brake van for Eaton Hall and in 1981 I was lucky enough to gain access to measure it in York Railway Museum - apologies these drawings had appeared quite recently on here as part of Bilco’s thread “Making a Brake for it” and I gratefully acknowledge Bill’s woek as being the impetus for my build.
ImageA11a by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageA11b by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
The starting point was a Smallbrook Heywood wagon chassis, beefed up with Plastruct sections.
ImageIMG_4055 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4058 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
Then scribing some 80thou plasticard for the sides, making sure to treat both sides the same to prevent warping. I then made a simple jig from card and timber off-cuts to ensure both sides were identical. The square posts are 3.2mm section – with the ‘chamfers’ around the side panels.
ImageIMG_4103 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
The sides were then fixed to the chassis
ImageIMG_4105 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4106 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
I constructwd the seats and back-rest from scrap plasticard. Left the whole lot overnight to dry thoroughly and then carefully sanded the seat section to be an exact fit between the sides.
ImageIMG_4115 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4115 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
I then fixed the framing around the drop down flap that forms the seat front (allowing for the thickness of the floor). Floor boards were cut from 5mm x 1.5mm timber strip from my local model shop and stained with my usual Promarkers. The body was given a couple of coats of Tamiya Red Bown spray and then the floor boards were fitted.
ImageIMG_4128 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4129 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
End rails were bent up and a brake handle made from bits of wire and tube.
ImageIMG_4196 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
A roof was made up using a pre-formed roof section available from the 7mm NGA and platicard arcs cut with a compass cutter. Here is the sub-assembly sprayed; it is left as loose fitting.
ImageIMG_4200 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
Iron banding round the floor boards was made from plastic section and a representation of the drop-down flap handle was pained and glued in place.
ImageIMG_4208 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr ImageIMG_4209 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
When it stops raining I will give it a mist of Dullcote.
ImageIMG_4215 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
Because I am a responsible researcher I never tried climbing in to the barke-van to test the sitting position – but the model would suggest someone a lot more flexible than this Preiser would be needed!
ImageIMG_4212 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
With sincere thanks to Bilco for all his help and advice – and to Harris the cat.

Cheers

David

User avatar
Bilco
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 1035
Joined: Mon Oct 29, 2007 3:55 pm
Location: Woodstock, Oxfordshire
Interests: 7mm & 16mm NG, Gn15

Re: Stackpole

Postby Bilco » Mon Feb 18, 2019 2:10 pm

Thank you for making the drawing available to me, David - it was a great help!
Bill

If at first you don't succeed, cheat.
Too soon old, too late smart.

https://sites.google.com/site/myoldlayouts/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/149926300@N07/albums

User avatar
Thorness
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 228
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 9:24 pm
Location: Wirral,UK
Interests: Small gauge railways, photography

Re: Stackpole

Postby Thorness » Mon Feb 18, 2019 3:50 pm

Bit late to the party!

This is the one at Eaton in 2014:

ImageEaton Hall Railway by Thorness, on Flickr


Cheers
Don
Don

Thrubwell Hall
R/C is the way to go.

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Fri Feb 22, 2019 2:28 pm

Eaton Hall 1 ton wagon

Along with the Eaton Hall Brake Van I measured in 1981 (see above) there was also a Small 1 Ton wagon – which I eventually got round to drawing in 1991.
ImageEaton Hall Railway by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

On a recent visit to Shapeways I noticed they had a very similar wagon, drawn by KeenEye Models and described as “1:24 Heywood 2x4 Basic Car Frame w/ Heywood Couplers”, so I ordered one. A “top” is also available for this wagon – next time!

The print that arrived was very nice indeed. Couplers were already attached and with axle boxes and Sir Arthur’s special ‘choppers’ for his couplings. The angle-iron frame for the floor boards is a separate print. As is my usual approach the prints were immersed in a bath of white spirit (turpentine substitute) for 24 hours; then they were given a gentle wash with Cif and an old toothbrush and finally given a good rinse in warm water and left to dry. The prints required very little smoothing.

The wagon’s frames are hollow inverted “U” shapes, so I filled them with Liquid Gravity held in place with a 50/50 mix of Copydex and water with just a dash of washing-up liquid. Again left overnight to dry.
ImageIMG_4207 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

To give a better surface to glue the floor-boards, I levelled the frame tops with Green Stuff and when that was dry sanded it back to a smooth finish.
ImageIMG_4216 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The axle boxes have long ‘pips’ which fit into holes in the frames (as can be seen above), so I just pushed these in place before spraying the whole assembly. This means once the paint is dry the axle boxes can be easily removed, leaving the mating surface unpainted – to allow the glue to hold things firmly at a later stage.
ImageIMG_4218 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

I did this because I was not certain that if the axleboxes were firmly glued in place before painting that I would be able to flex the frames enough to insert the wheels without damaging something. So the pre-painted wheels were placed in the axleboxes which, in turn, were place in their mounting holes in the frames but with nothing push home.
ImageIMG_4222 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

This then allowed me to put a spot of superglue under each axlebox and push everytning firmly in place.
ImageIMG_4223 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The “choppers” wre fitted to the couplings with a brass pin with the end bent over. I then cut and stained the floor-boards, placed them in the angle-iron frame and glued them to the chassis.
ImageIMG_4231 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Once dry, the frame was removed, the planks tidied up, the frame coloured with a Woodland Scenics “Rusty Rail” pen before gluing it back in place.
ImageIMG_4234 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4236 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

And here she is in a train.
ImageIMG_4233 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The Smallbrook kits make it easy (too easy?) to fit Kadee couplings – they work well but look awful! So I decided to mount the Haywood couplings on another wagon – and although they look good I am not sure they will cope with the excruraitingly tight curves I am going to have to adopt off-stage (well actually I am certain!). So as an experiment I mounted the Kadees under the Haywood’s. The choppers don;t couple (they would cause problems if they dud) but they are what you see, while the Kadees still do the work.

ImageIMG_4239 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Is it a worthwhile addition? What do you think? Is there something better I could mount in the NEM pockets?
ImageIMG_4240 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

And finally (a lot of home-work this week) how do you guys feel about these “blow-by-blow” build posts – keep them, only show the tricky bits, or cut straight to the finished models? Please let me know.

Cheers

David

User avatar
PeterH
Seasoned Campaigner
Seasoned Campaigner
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2008 6:54 am
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: Railway history, drinking beer

Re: Stackpole

Postby PeterH » Fri Feb 22, 2019 6:54 pm

Nice wagons. And a great idea to change locations by swapping the backscene.

I like the blow-by-blow posts myself. I enjoy seeing how others do it and I learn other ways to make things. Though it emphasises how slowly I model.
Peter

User avatar
Jon Randall
Demi-Millegniumer
Demi-Millegniumer
Posts: 993
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2007 11:18 pm
Location: NW Leics, England
Interests: Narrow gauge railways, modelling

Re: Stackpole

Postby Jon Randall » Thu Feb 28, 2019 5:35 pm

I agree with the blow by blow posts being a great way, we all learn things from time to time.

Excellent modelling David 8)
Jon Randall

Needs to stop procrastinating and start modelling

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Thu Jul 18, 2019 1:39 pm

Paving the Way
Work has started on the first “station” on the Stackpole Railway, Greenbridge Lodge, a sort of picnic site for the family and watering hole for the shooting parties. The plan is that the track in this area will be inset; so I purchased one of the 0n30 paver rollers from Rails n Scale’s Shapeways’ shop.

I soaked the roller overnight in white-spirit followed by a gentle scrub in warm soapy water. I spread DAS clay over a section of track, rolled the roller and the result was awful. The roller picked up the clay from between the rails and ... well, messy all around.
After a good wash down I had another go, better but still not good. Another scrub down, but I had learned some lessons.
Third attempt the track was fixed firmly in place.

ImageIMG_4757 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The track was then filled, to over rail height, with DAS clay, firmly pressed down. This was then covered with grease-proof paper and pressed down to rail level with the firm application of a rolling pin. (Looking at the photo more care should have been taken to get a smoother surface.)

ImageIMG_4759 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The roller was dunked in a 50% mix of washing up liquid and water, with the same solution brushed over the track. The roller was then pushed along using a spindle through the centre to increase downward pressure.

ImageIMG_4762 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

When dry the rail tops were cleaned (must do better next time!) and the whole thing given a coat of medium grey. That was followed by a Woodland Scenics Track Pen to rust the rail and the “girder rail”.

ImageIMG_4764 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

And when that was dry I applied some weathering.

ImageIMG_4767 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Relatively pleased. The secret seems to be to get a good, even surface before the roller is applied and use plenty of soapy water to keep roller and Das from clinging to each other. The rolling pin definitely helped and I have a wallpaper seam roller coming. If that makes things better I’ll let you know. (I do wish I had paid more attention to the outside of the rails!)

The first building for Greenbridge Lode is almost finished - a sort of staff/railwayman’s room, with a loo at the back.

ImageIMG_4770 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4772 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

Cheers

David

User avatar
PeterH
Seasoned Campaigner
Seasoned Campaigner
Posts: 440
Joined: Sun Sep 28, 2008 6:54 am
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: Railway history, drinking beer

Re: Stackpole

Postby PeterH » Sat Jul 20, 2019 9:12 pm

Nice pavers.
Peter

dijon
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Jan 15, 2019 1:46 am

Re: Stackpole

Postby dijon » Wed Jul 31, 2019 5:04 pm

And so it begins ...

The first of the buildings for Greenbridge Lodge is now finished (apart from internal detailing). It is, as some of you have already spotted, the Petite Properties 1/24th scale Wash-house and WC. It has been modified with wooden lintels, stone sills and a new “signal-box” style end-window, as befits the private railway of the Chairman of the GWR!

The brick paper is a lovely embossed card, the slate and ridge tiles are via e-bay, not cheap but superb. Weathering is paint, felt-tip and coloured pencil – as the layout is, primarily, set between 1915 and 1920 the weathering might be a little heavy, the railway had only just been built then, but that headland is a harsh environment!

The first picture shows a work’s train, the gardeners are obviously off somewhere while the supervisor enjoys the sun.

ImageIMG_4795 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr
ImageIMG_4800 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

And when all the activity has calmed down, Harris the cat, sits on the windowsill enjoying the last of the day’s rays.

ImageIMG_4806 by davidphillipjohn, on Flickr

The lodge itself should be next but the baseboard materials are arriving on Wednesday!

Cheers

Dvid

User avatar
Jon Randall
Demi-Millegniumer
Demi-Millegniumer
Posts: 993
Joined: Sat Jun 02, 2007 11:18 pm
Location: NW Leics, England
Interests: Narrow gauge railways, modelling

Re: Stackpole

Postby Jon Randall » Fri Aug 02, 2019 3:58 pm

Very smart 8)
Jon Randall

Needs to stop procrastinating and start modelling

User avatar
RoGNer
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 302
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 8:20 pm
Location: Wales
Interests: Narrow Gauge Railways; beer; Goblins

Re: Stackpole

Postby RoGNer » Thu Aug 08, 2019 10:34 am

8) Wow! Excellent work! Keep the pictures coming, looks superb
Roger
Keep it on the Short and Gnarrow!


Return to “Modelling Matters”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron