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Haywards Estate Railway

Posted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 12:39 am
by Gavin Sowry
Sorry folks, but due to a change in policy by the photo host site, some photos that originally were posted, can no longer be viewed

No this is not a spelling mistake. Haywards is a real place, not far from where I live....it makes a good play on Sir Arthurs name.
Anyhow, after dabbling around in Gn15, and ruffling a few feathers on this site, it's about time I fronted with some results. :wink:

Hayward4000.jpg
Hayward4000.jpg (45.83 KiB) Viewed 1226 times


I got a Bachmann On30 gasser and put on a Sidelines kit, the wagon is my original scratchbuilt entry into Gn15. The Workmans hut is something I knocked up for my garden railway, and the unfinished engineshed/workshop is now finished, and the layout commenced. The Morrie Minor truck is supposedly 1:26, but looks OK in this setting.
The whole lot is posed on my Sn3½ layout.
More to follow, especially stuff on how I built the shed.
It's taken a while to get the hang of this photo posting racket, and also the
fact that I'm still using real film. Oh, and if you are wondering how to get the ½ to show up in a message....make sure the NUM LOCK is ON, hold down the ALT KEY while you type in the number 171 on the number key board...amazing what happens when you read instructions! :idea:

Posted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 1:05 am
by Steve Bennett
Off to a good start Gavin, thats a nice little cameo you put together. The loco shed looks very interesting, have you any more pics of it :?: Looks to be a good size for a number of different uses.

Useful tip about the "½" never heard of that one before, must try and remember :) of course, should you forget the second 1 you get this "◄" sure that must have it's uses :)

Posted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 7:45 am
by Gavin Sowry
Haywards000.jpg
Haywards000.jpg (48.01 KiB) Viewed 1226 times


This shows how I did the shed/workshop. I used scribed basswood, two sheets to get the height. Marked out everything from the back, mirror image, and cut out. Note the lines for the bracing...basswood is VERY unstable, and does not stay at all flat. The bracing is not just for good looks. The window is Grandt Line. Overall size of the shed is 10' by 8', with the leanto workshop 10' by 6'. Stud is 10', sloping to 8'.
More to come later. 8)

Posted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 8:31 am
by Steve Bennett
Thanks for the extra info Gavin, very useful. I think you have provided the inspiration for the design for a fruit packing shed that I had been stuck on. It wont be very similar, but you have provided the trigger, thanks :) .

Posted: Fri Dec 15, 2006 4:35 pm
by michael
Gavin: A great start the cameo works well, suprising how posing the elements on your Sn3½ (neat trick thanks) works.
Perhaps it might be time to actually remove a few items that are the smaller scale and your layout gets a huge boost :twisted: .Is this what you would call "rubberscaling" :lol:

Michael

Re: Haywards Estate Railway

Posted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 12:01 am
by SpeedLimit20
Gavin Sowry wrote:... The whole lot is posed on my Sn3½ layout.
... Oh, and if you are wondering how to get the ½ to show up in a message....make sure the NUM LOCK is ON, hold down the ALT KEY while you type in the number 171 on the number key board...amazing what happens when you read instructions! :idea:


Probably the reason most people other than the Yanks call it Sn42 !
:wink:

Posted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 6:21 pm
by More_Cats_Than_Sense
If you use Word for Windows, go to the "Insert Symbol" option in the menu, it will give you the "Alt Code" for any number of interesting symbols and things! :wink:

Posted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 7:24 pm
by Jim Snee
Hi Gavin

It looks great! What more can I say?

TTFN

Jim

Posted: Sat Dec 16, 2006 9:21 pm
by Gavin Sowry
Here's another view, this more clearly shows the internal bracing, the end capping, and the progress of fascia boards etc. The initial coat of grey, is an automotive sanding undercoat spray, from a can. The weathering technique I use is to just dump the paint on, and when dry, scrape a lot of it off, then wash the whole thing with dirty turps. (rather prototypical, don't you think). The roof is weathered a different way, but doesn't show up well in this shot. I don't mix the paint too well, and apply numerous coats, sometimes when it is still half dry, I use acrylics. The differential drying and coating gives a pleasing result. :D

Hayward3000.jpg
Hayward3000.jpg (50.79 KiB) Viewed 1226 times

Posted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 8:48 am
by Gavin Sowry
:D :D :D Ah! now I'm getting the hang of posting multiple photo's. 8)
Here's the other two shots I tried to put in my previous post

Hayward2000.jpg
Hayward2000.jpg (51.42 KiB) Viewed 1226 times


Starting to look like a shed, rather than a collection of wooden cut outs, and I just had to try the track and loco for size. I'm using PECO On30 track, mainly because it was almost as cheap as component pieces for hand laid track. (I've been a hand laid track proponent for the last 30 years, mainly because no one makes Sn3½ track...and OO/HO don't cut the ice with me, afterall, I was a Track Engineer in a previous career).
I have tried the method recent posted in Gn15.info about getting tight radius track (take out the rails, prebend them, reinsert them, and cut appropriate joining bits of the sleeper base) and found it to be quite cool. 8) .
:idea: :idea: For bending the rail to the 200mm centerline radius that I want, on a piece of scrap MDF I drew with a compass, two lines of 208mm and 192mm radius. I then put nails each side of both lines, spaced the same width as the foot of the rail (dont measure it :? use a bit of rail).
Simply thread/force the rail through the series of nails (minimum 3 sets)
and 'el cheapo', bent rail.

Bit more extra work, and now we are starting to get somewhere. 8) 8)
Incidently, when 'designing' this shed, I was trying to be economical with the scribed siding (aint cheap, $NZ 10.00 a sheet, or about E 5.00, and roughly GBP 3.00). The sheets are 3" by 24". I went 2 high, so that gives an overall height of 12', and allowed a perimeter of 48', hence the overall
dimensions of 10' long by 14' wide. The chosen stud height dictated the roof pitch of 35 deg...I would have liked 45 deg to give it more character,
but that would mean having to go 3 sheets high. :cry:

Posted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:10 am
by Steve Bennett
Looking good Gavin. I really like the style of that building and it's good to have a description of how you built it. This is the kind of info that is usually glossed over in magazine articles, the internet certainly has advantages over the printed word for things like this and you can ask questions if there is something you are not sure about :) .

Your railbender sounds like it could be what a few on here have been looking for, very simple and can be set up for whatever radius is required. A lot more adaptable and predictable than my attempt at a home made one ( http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?t=347 ) , which was a bit more basic and not so easy to set for a specific radius. Really good info.

Posted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 12:13 pm
by Alex
Very nice layout. It's so full of life. Keep the pictures coming. :wink:

Posted: Sun Dec 17, 2006 11:14 pm
by Gavin Sowry
Steve Bennett wrote:Your railbender sounds like it could be what a few on here have been looking for, very simple and can be set up for whatever radius is required.


I have used the same method for bending code 332 rail on my garden railway.

The code 100 rail does actually spring back a little, but it holds a reasonable line, and I think drawing the two different radii is worth the effort...just remember to put the larger radius on the high leg (outside) of the curve.

Posted: Sun Dec 24, 2006 2:58 am
by Gavin Sowry
:D Seasons Greetings to all on the Gnatterbox, and especially the 435
people that have viewed this topic. :D

Chairman
Board of Directors
Haywards Estate Railway

Posted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 7:30 am
by Gavin Sowry
:D Well, here it is, the finished Engine Shed & Workshop to go on the Haywards Estate Railway.

attach036.jpg
attach036.jpg (60.61 KiB) Viewed 1226 times


I think that this will pass muster at an ordinary train show, but I am planning to extra detail the structure, things like guttering and downpipes,
and a door to add extra credability. I think a one piece sliding door on rail
would be appropriate. All very 'Colonial' don't you think?
Looks like my roof weathering technique shows up in the pictures this time. 8) 8)

Posted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:15 am
by Gerry Bullock
Looks great Gavin 8) . Not sure how you'll operate the sliding door unless you add a motor inside the shed.
My sliding door has a wire at back operated from rear of layout as the building extends to Backdrop - building is 390mm long :roll:

Posted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:51 am
by DCRfan
I can assure everyone Gavins engine shed looks great in the flesh.

Paul

Posted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 11:53 am
by Steve Bennett
Very nice Gavin, I really like the character of this little building. Should look great once installed onto a layout and bedded into it's surroundings.

Posted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 8:12 pm
by Gavin Sowry
Gerry Bullock wrote:Looks great Gavin 8) . Not sure how you'll operate the sliding door unless you add a motor inside the shed.
My sliding door has a wire at back operated from rear of layout as the building extends to Backdrop - building is 390mm long :roll:


:twisted: Perhaps I'll have it permanently open, and probably 'derailed'
to give it a bit of authenticity. :idea:

Posted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:25 pm
by DCRfan
Gavin Sowry wrote:
Gerry Bullock wrote:Looks great Gavin 8) . Not sure how you'll operate the sliding door unless you add a motor inside the shed.
My sliding door has a wire at back operated from rear of layout as the building extends to Backdrop - building is 390mm long :roll:


:twisted: Perhaps I'll have it permanently open, and probably 'derailed'
to give it a bit of authenticity. :idea:


Door derailed with a group of workers standing around discussing the fix and even better when it derailed it knocked over an oil container which spilled and one of the aforementioned workers walked through leaving footprints......hey I'm on a roll here :twisted: :twisted:

Paul

Posted: Thu Dec 28, 2006 9:41 pm
by Christoph
Hi Gavin ,

nice building , your Engine Shed & Workshop .
Interesting for me is the similarity with the DCR House, which I built some time ago .
http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a3/Chr ... ouse16.jpg
http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a3/Chr ... CR0608.jpg
http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a3/Chr ... CR0609.jpg
It seems to be a common building method in NZ .

Christoph

Posted: Fri Dec 29, 2006 12:01 am
by Steve Bennett
DCRfan wrote:Door derailed with a group of workers staning around discussing the fix and even better when it derailed it knocked over an oil container which spilled and one of the aforementioned worked walked through leaving footprints......hey I'm on a roll here :twisted: :twisted:


Not quite such a fertile imagination as Paul, but a broken door does make an excellent attention getter on a layout at shows. This one has started many conversations :

Image

The broken door was courtesy of an obnoxious kid who thought it would be fun to close the shed door. This was at the beginning of a 2 day show, so the door was just propped up against the side of the building and it got so much attention that on getting home it was glued into place like it. Must try and find the workers toolbox which seems to have gone walkabout, dont think i have used it on another layout :wink: .

Posted: Fri Dec 29, 2006 12:20 am
by DCRfan
Great. How would the real estate agent describe it 'a renovators dream' or possible 'needs some TLC'.

As for the location, isn't in the midde of arsenic tailings or something equilly nasty :cry:

Paul

Posted: Fri Dec 29, 2006 12:26 am
by Steve Bennett
Yes, there is a fair bit of arsenic around :) I'm not sure, but I think there could be an illegal trade in weedkiller going on from this shed :) .

Posted: Fri Dec 29, 2006 5:58 am
by Gavin Sowry
DCRfan wrote:Great. How would the real estate agent describe it ...


Talking of Real estate agents, my place was described as 'hilly backdrop'... what they didn't say was 'close to transport'. As you know, there is a railway line between my place and the hill that separates us.
When I was working for 'the firm', and comming home from late shift, the train always observed a stop at the signal next door, no matter what the indication was.