Weathering/Dry-brushing/Rusting

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

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Radbourne
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Weathering/Dry-brushing/Rusting

Postby Radbourne » Sun Jul 20, 2008 5:48 pm

Has anyone got any good tip for weathering/finishing items other than dry-brushing or rusting? I'd like to have a stab at using washes, but I'm reluctant to alter my current paint job.

Thanks in advance! :D
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Postby Dragon » Sun Jul 20, 2008 6:24 pm

First couple of times using washes.. do them with water colour paints..!

That way if you don't like it you can wash it all off and try again..

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Postby Radbourne » Sun Jul 20, 2008 6:28 pm

Thanks Dragon!

Loved 'Box End' today-what was the name of the paints you suggested? It sounded foreign-Italian maybe?
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Postby Gavin Sowry » Mon Jul 21, 2008 10:12 pm

:? I have effectively used a variation on the powdered chalk method....
very finely ground and sifted natural earth. I dunk a ½" brush into the container of dirt, then liberally apply the dirt all over the article to be weathered, and brush off the excess (more like blow it off, and the diluted moisture on my breath helps seal the dirt). I've also used ordinary plaster to get white weathering effects. :roll:
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Postby Dragon » Mon Jul 21, 2008 11:26 pm

farreste wrote:Thanks Dragon!

Loved 'Box End' today-what was the name of the paints you suggested? It sounded foreign-Italian maybe?


Um.. Anita's Acrylics.. generally about £1.25 a pot/tube thing from the local cheapy artshop. I think it's an American brand, and I'd not particularly rate them for being 'good quality, as if you're painting even primed surfaces you often need two coats as the coverage isn't consistant. They're more designed for painting onto absorbent surfaces like card than plastic.

However, on the flipside, they are cheap, and water down well to provide washes of varying strengths, which for some things is ideal.

As none of my stock is pristine condition visually, I find that the pro's outweigh the cons.

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Postby Steve Bennett » Tue Jul 22, 2008 12:53 pm

There are many similar brands to Anita's which all come in similar bottles.

Image

As Richard says, the quality is not upto the standards of the better modelling brands (Tamiya, Citadel, Vallejo etc) for painting loco's and rolling stock, but they are very good for scenic work or washes and dry brushing. I have used them with an airbrush for painting loco's and rolling stock and they give good results, but I personally wouldnt consider them for brush painting a loco, exept where the colour is built up with numerous washes, to gradually build the colour.

They are quite widely available though and cheap. A lot of DIY stores carry them, check the area which has the materials for stencilling. Also a lot of discount stores, craft shops, art stores and the like also stock various ranges. They are all pretty much the same paints, it is mainly the labels on the bottles that differ.

Hope this helps.
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Postby Radbourne » Tue Jul 22, 2008 7:24 pm

Thanks guys-I'll keep on the lookout next time im in Hobbycraft.
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Postby Radbourne » Fri Jul 25, 2008 7:51 pm

Are the Citadel washes any good? Are they just a bottled form of the technique used in Steve's tutorial on painting wood?
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Jul 27, 2008 10:45 am

farreste wrote:Are the Citadel washes any good? Are they just a bottled form of the technique used in Steve's tutorial on painting wood?


Was hoping somebody who uses the Citadel washes might come in on this one. I tried them a while ago and didnt really like them, so returned to my preferred use of poster paints. I found that they were difficult to get a soft edge to, drying too quick to give much time to manipulate and blend into the base colour. Maybe I was using them wrong, but I much prefer the cheaper and non-permanent nature of poster paints.
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Postby Jon Randall » Sun Jul 27, 2008 11:10 am

I use citadel washes quite a lot.
The brown and chestnut washes are good for using as wood stains.
I don't, however, use anything else so I can' t compare them against anything, sorry.
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Postby Radbourne » Sun Jul 27, 2008 12:22 pm

I've just purchased a dark brown wash from my local Games Workshop. I'll have a go and let you know how I get on, but it may mean buying a few more wagons from you Steve. :D
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Postby MOG » Sun Jul 27, 2008 4:47 pm

The brown ink from GW is useful - staining wood (balsa etc).. also for adding depth to other colours. It is quite strong undiluted.
If you are going to try it one of Steve's wooden wagons, should work a treat.
One method..

1. Prime first. I use a grey matt spray 'Plasticote' .. weems to cover more evenly than the car primers I've tried before.

2. When dry, apply a base coat. A lighter shade than you want..something like Buff.

3. When dry, wash the brown ink over and let it dry.

If it's too dark, a light dry brush to add highlight.


It's A method.. not necessarily the best! :wink:
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Jul 27, 2008 5:56 pm

SGLR Steve wrote:I've just purchased a dark brown wash from my local Games Workshop. I'll have a go and let you know how I get on, but it may mean buying a few more wagons from you Steve. :D


:lol: :lol: :lol:
Well, at least I cant be accused of the hard sell on this one :wink: .
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Postby Radbourne » Sun Jul 27, 2008 5:59 pm

I cant' fault your models at all Steve-the level of detail is amazing for non-confident scratchbuilders like myself.

I'm just wondering that after using Revell 'Aqua' Beige, I should probably try 'Elf Flesh' from Citadel, as the beige gives a much more weather beaten look when given a wash of diluted black poster paint. The other option is to use a lighter brown wash I guess?
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Jul 27, 2008 6:08 pm

Experiment away Steve. The great thing with acrylics, is that they go on so thin, if you need to paint over again, the paint still wont be thick enough to cover the detail. Dont be afraid to try a few different combinations of colours on a piece of plasticard or similar. Experimentation like that often gives results you never expected and could be perfect for the finish you want, I still get surprised at some of the unexpected results from playing around with these kind of things, you can never be 100% certain how they will come out, thats all part of the fun :lol:
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Postby Radbourne » Sun Jul 27, 2008 6:11 pm

Cheers for the encouragement Steve. Expect an order sometime tomorrow for some 'practice' wagons! :D
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Postby KEG » Sun Jul 27, 2008 6:45 pm

Hi,

I mainly use cheap acrylic paints from tubes for washes. dilute them very thin, almost like water with alcohol (meth spirit?)

Paint them on with a soft brush and blow them with a hair dryer in every corner. Within a few seconds they are dry and I can see, if I have to go over it again or not.

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weathering

Postby Anonymous » Mon Jul 28, 2008 4:14 pm

Forgive me any repetition, but one of the tricks of the trade is to get a good soft weathering by buying a can of light grey plastic bumper paint from Halfords and just giving the model a light misting. It instantly makes all the colours recede delicately, and flattens any gloss. The (card-built) engine, and the plastic GVT 4-tonners here, have only been weathered by a couple of squirts.

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