Simplicity Sidings

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

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chris stockdale
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Postby chris stockdale » Fri Sep 05, 2008 4:23 pm

henrix72se wrote:Looking Really Great !! :D

Can you tell us a bit about the water in the front. Is it just blank paint or did you use another method ?

I (almost) finished a little creek on my layout and is about to add some kind of "water", but hesitate about which way to go.


Henrik,

May I suggest you pop a pic in here? I gnow your work is the 'wrong' scale, but it could always go in Blether.

Regrettably, whilst we 7/8ths can 'see' (as guests, if not members) what is happening in the Gnatterbox the reverse is not true of the 7/8th Lounge. I am sure that the good folk in here would:

a. Be only too happy to help

b. Enjoy a look at a fine bit of modeling

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Postby richard andrews » Fri Sep 05, 2008 4:46 pm

Henrick
First I painted the base, then I painted on quite thickly the pva glue, but it does take a long time to dry but when it is first on it is all whit
e but as it dries it becomes clear, or you could use a water based clear varnish which will do the same thing.

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Postby MOG » Sat Sep 06, 2008 10:21 am

I'm a fan of the pva water trick.. used it on Plankerton Wharf too.. just built up a couple of layers ontop of some murky paint.

Frustratingly, I saw this thread just a day after a broken up a perfect sheet of polysterene to make wargames hills for Mog Junior..AND I've used up the last of my mounting board.. :roll: I would like to try and follow the method quite closely rather than just bodge my way through (WHAT?! sorry - 009 and 3mm influencing my bodgeriness.. must do more Gn15!).

I just remembered that Versif left me a load of concrete and brick making stuff too that he had bought for his stalled project (now in Emrys' care).. must dig that out and have a play.
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The Road to Kirrin Pier

Postby AndyA » Sat Sep 06, 2008 3:58 pm

Okay, I've made a start now. The biggest job this weekend is to clad the board for Pilgrim Quay, but this project will use the offcuts (or perhaps Pilgrim Quay is using the offcuts from this - do they count as offcuts if you selected the materials for hte big project specifically to yield them?)

The starting point is just like Steve's original, but maybe I have one thing to add...

Image

Widley notices that I'm a couple of mil out but is too polite to mention it. The board and cassette will each be 280mm long, the board being 150mm wide.

Image

Having only one manufactured edge, because the insulation sheet broke when I was carrying it home, I striped masking tape down one side, checked for square wrapped it round and checked for square and width on the back. The dimensions were decided on for two reasons. One, the new printer will print 280mm in one go, which will become important later, and two, the board plus cassette will fit on top of my little bookcase, padded by the soon-to-be corrugated sandwich building.

Image

Now I stippled the pVA on with a two-inch paintbrush, paying especial attention to the edges. I used the masking tape to align the two faces and 'clamped' it with mugs filled with water (I'm out of tins and jars because of the big board). Now there is no room to move in the kitchen at all, so the building will have to wait for an hour or so.

regards
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PS, mention of the PVA water trick (for which I use a specialist PVA sealer rather than actual glue) reminds me that I have a stream to install on Sue's board as well. Hmmm, next time I need to find stuff that dries quicker. :)
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Postby AndyA » Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:11 pm

Okay, I resisted temptation to touch anything until it all had set. I had conveniently thought ahead and made a disposable test piece so I could tell when it was dry. (or maybe the first piece I cut was the wrong size; I don't recall :) ).

When it was all dry I took the masking tape off and trimmed it. I used the cleaver you can see at right, heated in a gas flame. Worked well, but I seem to recall the fumes are toxic in quantity. We have two industrial strength (literally, the house was previously owned by a restauranteur) kitchen fans, but I'll do the big board in small sections to let the fumes get extracted.

Image

This is the end result. I'm quite pleased with them (readers of the Pilgrim Quay thread will know why there are two, but in fact I had this other good idea and eventually did three. Elapsed time from start to finish, two hours. Working time, thirty minutes including cutting the 'disposable prototype'. If I can do it, I reckon anyone can. Come on in, the water's lovely.

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Last edited by AndyA on Sun Sep 07, 2008 8:11 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sat Sep 06, 2008 8:15 pm

Glad to see you have Widley there to supervise Andy :lol:
Good to hear that you were pleased with the results of your experiments, as you found, it is quick and easy to build a base in this way, will be interesting to hear how rigid the big one is.

Thats a very good point you raised about the length. Sticking to a standard paper/card size, does make life a lot easier. Not only for printing, but also finding card for construction, wish I had thought of it before starting, it would have been a lot simpler :roll:
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Postby AndyA » Sat Sep 06, 2008 9:52 pm

Ah but Steve, if you'd always stuck to standard lengths (of which more in the morning), you probably wouldn't have come up with the firebell, which is a pure magic detail. It's all swings and roundabouts.

(Widley is actually there because he has asked to be washed again tomorrow morning, after riding on a steam train - Terrier 622 Martello - at Wallingford festival last weekend, so that he will look his best for Hungary next week.)

regards
and good night all
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Postby AndyA » Sun Sep 07, 2008 8:10 am

Moin Moin.

I did another ten minutes work on the boards - tracklaying. I have the basic concept sorted out so this was dead easy, even first thing in the morning. It took me longer to find the side-cutters and glue than to lay the track.

I marked out the centre-line, put the track in place and eyeballed it, deciding that the center-lines should be 40mm from each edge of the board (actually, mark it out from one side because as Widley noticed, I was a couple of mil out.

Image

Next I cut one length of track full length, the other 75mm shorter. Various people here have some magic rail cutters. I used my ordinary side-cutters. I'm afraid the as with the traverser layouts, I'm not even going to file the ends, simply using the machined ends for the track joints. One piece of scrap track sproinged somewhere behind the stereo. I think I'll leave it.

Image

I didn't pin the track, although I will for the big layouts. I simply glued the track in place with Evo-Stick TimeBond, a product that I've mentioned before. It doesn't say 'Impact Adhesive for the Ham-fisted, but it should. It works like a standard impact adhesive, but allows a period for alight adjustment. Now I'll let it set off fully before starting with the cladding.

I'm up to forty minutes now. Okay, it'll slow down from here on, but I could run trains if I wanted. This is fun. A note on the concept. My fiftieth birthday treat was a weekend on the Isle of Purbeck, and I said I'd make a layout as a memento. This will be it. Kirrin is one of the settings for Enid Blyton's "Famous Five" series and Corfe is big on Enid Blyton, having, I gather, been used as Kirrin station in a TV series. I see this as a ball-clay outlet somewhere near Kimmeridge, the backdrop being a warehouse, the double-gate opens out onto the public highway, the modelled area is private and the single line out of the other side leads through a (permanently closed) gate to the pier proper.

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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Sep 07, 2008 9:35 am

:shock: 40 minutes work, to build the board and lay the track, that was a surprise. I took a lot longer than that, but I suppose I was photographing and writing up how to do it at the same time, made it seem longer. Careful, you will lose your bodger status if you carry on like this :lol: .
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Groundwork

Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Sep 07, 2008 10:53 am

I'm a little sad now, this project is really nearing completion. This was brought home when most of the main elements were all glued together. Will have to drag out the detailing to make it last, I guess :lol: .

GROUNDWORK

This section is really about filling in the gaps around the pieces that have already been made. The first step was to fix all the pieces into their final place, with a couple of exceptions. The backdrop building and the gates are not being fixed yet, to allow access for working on the ground. The walls, fencing and paving were all stuck together now, using a waterproof PVA adhesive, so that they stay together when the the diluted glue to hold the ground textures is applied.

The process I'm using here, is really a continuation of applying the ballast. Using the same material, the Woodland Scenics light grey ballest to cover the rest of the ground, means that there is no defined edge to the track, it just sits there blending with the surroundings. I use a cheap plastic teaspoon to lightly sprinkle into place overlapping the ballast that is already stuck down.

Here we see the buffer stops at the end of the track, the ballast having been applied around the one on the left. This also illustrates, how the ballast changes colour after glue is applied, note how much lighter the infill is at this stage.

Image

The same process is then applied to the other bare areas, taking the ground upto the walls and the edges of the board. Once in place, dilute white glue is applied in much the same way as for the ballast, but as this is representing rough ground, I dont take quite so much care to avoid disturbing it. Once wet through with the dilute glue mix, I then sprinkle on a bit of greenery, in places where weeds are likely to grow. This will when dry, be held in place by the same glue that holds the ballast underneath and blends things together nicely. I will show this a bit closer with one of the trickier areas in a moment, first a more overall shot. Excuse the colour of the green, it is still soaking wet with white glue and will dry a much better colour.

Image

Now I did make life a bit difficult for myself with the barbed wire fence being built on a sub-base and so close to the edge of the board. It does though give me a chance to show, the ballast and greenery technique a bit closer though.

First off the area under the fence was covered in the ballast and a small paintbrush used to brush and tamp it into place, much like doing the track. This photo shows work in progress, the bit on the right already in place.

Image

Once all in place, the ballast is soaked in dilute glue again, then the greenery sprinkled onto it. This is the effect I was after.

Image

As this is right at the front, it is worth taking a little time to get right.

Now to let it dry before adding a bit more in the way of plant life.
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Postby dr5euss » Sun Sep 07, 2008 11:02 am

Is the greenery WS fine turf?

I like the fire hydrant sign, that's a nice touch 8) Paving looks alright now, too :wink:

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Postby Nick Ellingworth » Sun Sep 07, 2008 11:19 am

Excellent work Steve.

I've finally started laying track on my layout and only need to do a couple more things to have a finished traverser. :D
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Postby henrix72se » Sun Sep 07, 2008 11:24 am

Steve Bennett wrote:There are some better pics of the water a few pages ago, this should take you straight THERE.
The next message after that, Richard describes how it was just PVA glue applied over a painted surface. Hope that helps.

Thanks Steve, I missed that.
/Henrik
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Postby henrix72se » Sun Sep 07, 2008 11:31 am

Richard Andrews wrote:Henrick
First I painted the base, then I painted on quite thickly the pva glue, but it does take a long time to dry but when it is first on it is all whit
e but as it dries it becomes clear, or you could use a water based clear varnish which will do the same thing.


Thanks Richard, nice method but I do not think it will work in my case, since I want the bottom to be visible and it has several levels I want to be visible also.

/Henrik
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Postby henrix72se » Sun Sep 07, 2008 11:39 am

Chris Stockdale wrote:Henrik,
May I suggest you pop a pic in here? I gnow your work is the 'wrong' scale, but it could always go in Blether.

Here is a few tasters. You can see some more on my site at http://78n18.laurell.nu/models/bmt/2008/log0808.html but below is made after that logbook was published. The track is just put there for the photo.

/Henrik

Image

Image

Image
Last edited by henrix72se on Sat Aug 14, 2010 8:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Sep 07, 2008 2:10 pm

dr5euss wrote:Is the greenery WS fine turf?


Yes it is Woodland Scenics fine turf, I think the colour is their Burnt Grass (I lost the bag years ago :roll: )

I like the fire hydrant sign, that's a nice touch 8) Paving looks alright now, too :wink:


Thanks, that was a bit of fun on the computer, worked out very well. Have now installed the cover for the hydrant aswell, pics later.
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Postby Panda » Sun Sep 07, 2008 2:21 pm

Henrik that is really cool! I love the little mini-simplex (or duplex as they are sometimes known!)

Steve how heavy (or light :) ) is that mini layout? It looks really really good. Shame I've got a 9 month modelling ban or I would have a go!
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Postby Bob Taylor » Sun Sep 07, 2008 2:26 pm

More great ideas :D It gets better every instalment.

Whilst not a copy (not even close) I have been inspired to start a small diorama/layout myself after looking time and time again at this thread. It's in Gnine so I will post in the appropriate place.

It also goes against what I said to Nick about concentrating on one project at a time. This is utter rubbish :shock: What else can you do while the glues drying on the other project? :lol: :wink:



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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Sep 07, 2008 2:32 pm

mogbass01 wrote:Steve how heavy (or light :) ) is that mini layout?


Very light PJ, not weighed it yet, but I will when it is finished :lol:
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Postby Nick Ellingworth » Sun Sep 07, 2008 2:35 pm

I've still not laid the track on the layout (I'll do that tomorrow) but the traverser is now complete and I've been able to test that it works by simply connecting power to it and running the loco on to a piece of loose flexitrack. :D
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Sep 07, 2008 2:36 pm

Bob Taylor wrote:Whilst not a copy (not even close) I have been inspired to start a small diorama/layout myself after looking time and time again at this thread. It's in Gnine so I will post in the appropriate place.


Thats good to hear Bob, I'm tempted to start another aswell, but guess I had better finish this one first :lol: .

More inspiration on the way, just got some more pics from Richard that I need to edit before posting.
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Sep 07, 2008 3:09 pm

Here we go, the latest trio of pics of Richards version for your enjoyment :D

Image

Image

Image

Oh, one more, here is a closer view so you can see the very nicely carved brickwork :)

Image
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Postby Gerry Bullock » Sun Sep 07, 2008 3:48 pm

Looks great Richard - as do all your layouts. I say the last time I saw the guy with the fork he was in Slovenia repairing the walkway between Salt Pans. He gets about a bit. :wink:
So little time, so many ideas!!!!! GerryB.
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Postby Willow Creek Traction » Sun Sep 07, 2008 4:10 pm

Bob Taylor wrote:. . . concentrating on one project at a time . . . utter rubbish :shock: What else can you do while the glues drying on the other project?
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later, Forrest Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -- Nikola Tesla, July, 1934

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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Sep 07, 2008 6:26 pm

MORE GROUNDWORK

Now I'm sure that the use of greenery to hide joins around buildings and other features wont be new to most here, but if you are using printed sheets or paper products, applying this can be a problem. This is especially so if you use prints from an inkjet printer, as the last thing you want near it is any form of liquid. Now you could of course use something like superglue to stick stuff down, but anyone who has tried it will know what a mess you can get in with it.

This method uses a traditional diluted white glue, but keeps the liquid content to a minimum, so lessens the risk of damage to paper products. It is very simple, but can take a while, especially if you are like me and once started, dont know when to stop :lol: .

The first step is to mix up some of your chosen ground cover with dilute white glue. Let it soak up the glue, you want it fairly wet

Image

Now to apply this just where you want it, a tool is needed to pick it up and transfer it to where you want it on the layout. My preference is a pair of fine tweezers, these enable small amounts to be applied, with the added bonus that you can also squeeze a lot of the liquid out. A small paintbrush could also be used, but will carry more liquid. In addition it is useful to have a pointed tool to prod the ground cover into place. A wooden toothpic will do the job very well, but quickly becomes tacky with the glue, so I prefer plastic or metal tools. Here are a few I use.

Image

At the top is an old plastic paintbrush handle, the end turned to a point in a pencil sharpener. Next a pin vice with an old darning needle ( I think most here are old enough to know what they are :) ), then a piece of Evergreen Styrene rod, with the end formed to a point. Add to the list, plastic toothpics which are ideal, I couldnt find mine so had to improvise.

Using the tweezers or paintbrush to transfer the groundfoam to the layout, you can place it just where you want it, without effecting the surrounding area. Because it is already soaked in glue, no more is required and once dried out, it will be fixed into position. Here is this technique used to hide the base of the wall and also to have a few weeds growing between the paving, which being card and paper, wouldnt take too kindly to much moisture.

Image

And one more pic showing how the gaps under the paving are filled and and around other details are hidden.

Image

Just for George, have included the fire hydrant cover and sign :wink:

Finally, to finish up this section, I should point out that just one green is used thoughout. This ensures that it all matches up and in a small area like this, brings the scene together. You can use other shades of green over the top to introduce extra plant growth, but it is not really needed, thus keeping the costs down :wink:
Last edited by Steve Bennett on Fri Sep 12, 2008 10:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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