Design and Construction of the Wildcat Brewing Co.

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Design and Construction of the Wildcat Brewing Co.

Postby foswaldy13 » Sun Mar 22, 2009 11:03 pm

Well, I am only a little frustrated right now, since I had this entire post ready to submit and I accidentally closed the browser window. so here is the second draft.......


Well I am nearly ready to start construction on my first Gn15 layout, the Wildcat Brewing Co, a fictional brewery. It will be a 15” (obviously :shock:) industrial line that runs throughout the brewery. I am starting with a 4’x5’ baseboard that I had built as the start to an abandoned On30 logging layout. My plan will be 3’x5’ with a 1’x5’ staging area behind it. Because I am an Architect, or maybe just because I am simply crazy (not sure which yet) I am designing the whole brewery complex in the art deco style. The brewery is to have been built in 1934 immediately after the end of prohibition.

Here is the plan……

Image

The dark grey areas represent the backdrop, medium grey represents the paved areas of the yard and the light great areas are loading docks. The small building to the lower left of the plan is a small locomotive, railroad car repair shed. The Admin building, where all employees clock in and out at the begging and end of each shift, to the lower right has a water tower on the roof, and a water treatment facility and passenger station on the ground floor. The green areas represent the “yard”, a gravel/grassy unkempt area that has paved/gravel paths criss-crossing from building to building.

While planning the layout, I also put some thought into the operation of the layout. A system of random car assignment will place various cars at loading docks, and then a system (which has not yet been devised) will determine the order and final destination of car movements.

A typical operating session would begin with a passenger train leaving the station and delivering employees to their respective buildings. Then a series of random car movements will take place. These include but are not limited to
1. Water tank car going from treatment facility to the brewhouse
2. Supplies such as barley, hops and yeast being moved to the brewhouse
3. Large beer kegs moved to aging/bottling
4. Small beer kegs (for smaller batch craft beers) moved to bottling facility
5. Crates of bottled beer moved to warehouse
6. Random loco breakdowns requiring replacement engine, and towing broken engine to repair facility
7. Work train with tools and machine parts taking parts to broken brewery equipment
At the end of each shift the passenger train will again make the rounds in order to take employees back to the admin building, where they can clock out and enjoy the fruits of their labor. (fresh cold beer)

I have also designed what the three main buildings will look like….

Image

The brewhouse will be tan/beige stucco with blue accents while the warehouse will be made white stucco with blue trim. The Bottling facility will be semi-gloss blue tile and tan/beige stone tiles with aluminum trim. The blank white areas represent doors that I am still designing to fit the art deco theme. The very pale blue areas are glass block/windows.

Hopefully you Gnatterboxers will have criticism/ ideas/ questions/ comments that you would be willing to share if you think there is a way to improve my design. I have printed out a full size copy of the plan and have placed it on the baseboard.

Once Steve gets me my davenport conversion and wagons (Hopefully he hurries since the anticipation is killing me :wink: ), and the On30 track I have ordered arrives I will temporarily lay the track and turnouts out and make sure things work as I think they will. Once that I is done and clearances are checked, I will begin permanently laying track and start construction of buildings.

I have posted higher resolution copies of the plan and elevation on my flickr page if anyone is interested. They can be found here…

http://www.flickr.com/photos/foswaldy13/3377274192/

and here…..

http://www.flickr.com/photos/foswaldy13/3376460665/

Have a great day everyone,
Matt
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Postby dtsalek » Mon Mar 23, 2009 12:53 am

Cool! 8) I think your plan is great! Looks to me to have plenty of operational potential, plus even a roundy round if you just want to watch the train go by! :) Granted, this is coming from someone who has yet to finish a layout. But is a layout ever really "finished". :? Perhaps others who have actually accomplished something will have other ideas :roll: ,but I love it. If I could finish whatever I'm doing now, I may even steal the trackplan!
BTW, what materials are the structures going to be built from? Being an architect, you ,I am guessing have some insight into some techniques we may not know. If so, please don't keep'em secret!
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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 12:58 am

The look I was going for with the trackwork, was something like cookies pizza layout shown here.

Image

The yard wont be quite so overgrown, but not too far off from what I am envisioning.
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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 1:06 am

The whole reason I struggled for so long with the track plan was the fact that I wanted the ability for not only good operation, but the ability to watch trains go roundy round when I just want to relax, or when I have visitors come over.

You are more than welcome to steal the trackplan, but I would like to see what you come up with if you do.

I am still trying to decide how to build the structures. The stucco finish is what I am really struggling with right now. I am trying to find a sand finish paint, that has a very light texture. I like the finish here...
http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?t=5026
and it looks great but for an art deco structure is probably too textured. I am going to experiment with painting a somewhat fine sandpaper to see if that gives a finer texture.
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Postby dtsalek » Mon Mar 23, 2009 1:38 am

yeah....You may be on to something with the fine sandpaper. That should be pretty easy to work with..I know my local Menards has quite a variety of texture paints, but perhaps they would all scale out too large for the effect you are looking for. I don't know if Ians paintgre on his stucture is the finest grit available. Now I'm curious! I'll have to check when I get home! Great! Another project! I don't have to come up with great ideas! Everyone here does it for me, which is good for building my modelling skills and knowledge base. The wife hates me for saving everthing now, just because it "looks like a future silo or boiler", or is going to be tread plate material. She would love to see the demise of this site!
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Postby michael » Mon Mar 23, 2009 3:47 am

Hello Matt, the grassy track and the pristeen Art Deco buildings seem a little inconruous. Will you be giving the buildings a bit of a tired look, (company put the money into great beer instead of building maintenance) :twisted:

I am looking forward to seeing this evolve.
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Postby Dallas_M » Mon Mar 23, 2009 3:49 am

foswaldy13 wrote:The whole reason I struggled for so long with the track plan was the fact that I wanted the ability for not only good operation, but the ability to watch trains go roundy round when I just want to relax, or when I have visitors come over.


Hi Matt --

The whole plan looks great ... structure, design & operating concepts look quite promising ... and the art deco will be a really nice and distinctive touch! :D

I favor a bit of roundy-round myself for the same reasons ... working on a layout of similar size with a continuous loop and a few sidings to allow for some simple operation. Though I think mine will tend toward UN-deco ... or at least a bit run-down ... maybe decrepo? :lol:

Constructive criticism part ... (disregard at will! 8) ) ... might just be my own personal taste, but I favor having things just a bit askew ... on this layout, front track is parallel to front edge of layout ... buildings are also parallel to that ... truck area and several tracks are exactly perpendicular to front edge ...

Might be more pleasing to add some slight curves or subtle angles ... throw things 5 or 10 degrees off, etc. Again, might just be my taste ... or lack thereof! :lol: ... but definitely something I'm working on ... my own layout is almost the exact same size and I do know how hard it is to squeeze things into place ... and still apply these ideas.

And the usual disclaimer for any "critiques" that I may offer: adapt, apply or disregard at will ... no offense intended and none taken! :wink:
Cheers,
Dallas

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Postby Ian-IoM » Mon Mar 23, 2009 11:16 am

foswaldy13 wrote: ...probably too textured...

You're probably right there, it is quite heavily textured and the colour is a bit spottly too (creamy off-white with light brown flecks), although that doesn't really show in the photos. There are a range of textured spray paints available though, some with a much finer texture so it might be a possibility to look at.

Looks like it should be an impressive layout, I'll look forward to seeing how it turns out :)
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Postby KEG » Mon Mar 23, 2009 1:40 pm

Hi,

That´s quite an amibitious and impressing Gn15 layout concepte.
A 4 story brewery must be huge. I´d estimate at leat more than 2 feet / 60 cm high. It will dwarf the tiny Gn15 rolling stock.

A friend of mine of Bavaria ist just constructung a brewery backdrop in 1 : 22,5 with 60cm prototype rail (26 mm model gauge)

Image

This is part of "Die Kreativmeile" a larger modular layout in Germany.

I wonder from which side the US layout will be operated? From the front you can not see what is happening at the fiddle yard, from the rear, you don´t know, what running in the operating area.

Have Fun

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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:09 pm

Michael, I think you are right that the run down yard might seem odd against the art deco structures. I will have to rethink how to finish that area.
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Postby KEG » Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:15 pm

Hi,

I just googled for some US Art Deco architechtural buildings:

http://www.mdpl.org/About%20Us/highres.html

I don´t know, if I´d drink a beer brewed or served in such a building.
I´d expect to run into Mickey Mous or Batman at the bar the next moment.

Have Fun

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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:38 pm

Dallas, thanks for the input, I really struggled trying to fit the turnouts for the two sidings on the right in. Originally I had the front track on an angle across the front of the layout, but could not fit the sideings in.

After your criticism, which is much appreciated, I have rotated the back buildings, and am in the process of a minor reworking of the track. The rails across the front and left will most likely have to remain the way they are to get everything to fit. I will work out a revised plan over lunch and will hopefully get an uncolored jpeg up then.
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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:46 pm

KEG wrote:A 4 story brewery must be huge. I´d estimate at leat more than 2 feet / 60 cm high. It will dwarf the tiny Gn15 rolling stock.


Yes, I really wanted to emphasize the small size of the trains, which is why the buildings are so tall. 2 feet tall was a pretty good guess. From my current drawings the tip of the tallest roof is 1' 11.5 inches high.

My layout will be operated from the front, but since I have a walk around dcc throttle, I will be able to move around to the back whenever I interchange with the fiddle yard.
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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 2:49 pm

I almost forgot, Another reason for the tall buildings is to act as the backdrop, I am not wild on shelf layouts, simply because I prefer the scenery or structures to form the backdrop.
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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 3:02 pm

Keg, I am not sure about running into Batman, but I wouldnt mind Mickey. You are right, many of the Batman movies and other comic book movies have used art deco buildings as scenes. For some reason the movies focus more on the darker side of art deco, rather than the more common miami style of art deco. One of my favorite examples of art deco is the Hoover Factory in London. Visible here...
http://www.artandarchitecture.org.uk/as ... 642129.jpg


For those who are not aware, Art Deco was very popular in the 20's and 30's. Many of the worlds early tall buildings (ie..Chrysler building, Empire State, Rockafeller center, and many of the older buildings in downtown Melbourne Australia) were designed in the Art Deco style. Initially it was very expensive as all the furnishings and glass work was handmade in small batches. This meant only the rich could afford it. Eventually companies began to mass produce Art Deco items, making it available to the masses, and lessening the wealthy's desire for it, eventually killing the style. Within the last 20 years some elements of the style have started to re-appear, and some (very optimistic) people think the style may be reborn with a modern flair. I highly doubt we see a resurgance, but I would love it if that was the case.

Well I guess that is the forums architecture lesson for the day. Ha ha. :roll:

I hope no one mided.
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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:18 pm

foswaldy13 wrote:I am still trying to decide how to build the structures. The stucco finish is what I am really struggling with right now. I am trying to find a sand finish paint, that has a very light texture. I like the finish here...
http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?t=5026
and it looks great but for an art deco structure is probably too textured. I am going to experiment with painting a somewhat fine sandpaper to see if that gives a finer texture.


Not really sure a textured paint is the way to go for an art deco building Matt, most I have seen have very crisp plastering and the crispness is all part of the style. From a scale viewing distance, it would seem to be perfectly smooth, but that might lack a bit of character. Rather than sandpaper, you might find ordinary printer paper would give enough texture to give the right effect.

Another dodge, is to use an aerosol primer, applied from slightly further away than normal, so the paint is almost dry when it hits the surface. I used this on a building to depict whitewashed walls, you can see how it looked here

http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?p=4523#4523
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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:50 pm

Steve, you are probably right that it would be too much texture. I will give your spray from a distance idea a shot on a test piece to see if that achieves the desired effect.

While we are on the subject of painting, anyone have any ideas how to acheive the varied color tan stone look that I have on the bottling facility on the right? I was planning to use styrene sheet ( plasticard ) and lighlty scribing it, but am trying to figure out how to get the variegated look, not only from stone to stone, but within each stone.
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Postby KEG » Mon Mar 23, 2009 6:19 pm

Hi,

I´d load down a suitable pottery or marble texture and slighty alter each sheet with a suitable programm. Photoshop or whatever. Cut to suitae pieces anglue on.

http://www.mayang.com/textures/Manmade/html/Pottery%20and%20Ceramic/index.html

What are you using for switches and track? You mentiones, you orderes them ready made.

Have Fun

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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 6:34 pm

KEG wrote:What are you using for switches and track? You mentiones, you orderes them ready made.


I am using Micro-Engineering On30 track for two reasons. First, they are located here in St. Louis and I felt like supporting a local company, and second, I like the way it looks.
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Postby KEG » Mon Mar 23, 2009 7:11 pm

Hi,

we nailed down some of these Micro Engineerung track and a 16 degree switch the other day.

Image

The track profile is lower than the well known and often used Peco narrow gauge track. The turnouts are finescale products, so my Magic Train drives have difficulties running through them. We had to alter the switch slightly.

I am not sure yet, if I am convinced of the of the sleeperseize. The length is OK, but the width looks too small for Gn15. Probably will have to use plenty of grass or sand for balasting to hide it.

Have Fun

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Updated plan

Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 7:35 pm

Well I have reworked the plan, taking as much of Dallas' wisdom into account as I could, so here it is.

Image

Because the above photo is not terribly clear I have hosted a copy at my flickr page. Dont worry dial up users, it is still only 100k and is availible here....

http://www.flickr.com/photos/foswaldy13 ... 9/sizes/o/

Have a great day everyone, and thanks for all the ideas thoughts and criticism.[/img]
Last edited by foswaldy13 on Mon Mar 23, 2009 9:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Dallas_M » Mon Mar 23, 2009 8:40 pm

Hi Matt --

On paper, it's a subtle change ... but I think as it takes shape, those extra angles will make the :shock: (view) more interesting ... instead of seeing a "box" around the layout, the :shock: (eyes) should bounce around a moment and wander into various parts of the scene ... this will be further enhanced when you reach the "golden days" of detailing the layout ... placement of figures, trees/bushes, etc ... all will add little vignettes in front of the distinctive backdrop.

So ... Looks great! ... eager to :shock: (watch) the developments! And, kudos for the effort ... good job of adjusting the visual composition while juggling the practical elements of fitting the track. :wink:

Gee, those little :shock: 's are so versatile ...
Cheers,

Dallas



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Re: Updated plan

Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Mar 23, 2009 9:14 pm

foswaldy13 wrote:Well I have reworked the plan, taking as much of Steves wisdom into account as I could, so here it is.


Not me, that would be Dallas :wink:
A layout as complex as this is beyond my understanding, I get confused these days when I have more than a yard/metre of track. Throw in a turnout and I'm completely lost :lol:
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Postby foswaldy13 » Mon Mar 23, 2009 9:47 pm

Whoops, Of course I meant Dallas, not Steve.
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Postby michael » Tue Mar 24, 2009 12:31 am

While we are on the subject of painting, anyone have any ideas how to acheive the varied color tan stone look that I have on the bottling facility on the right?


Matt in a former life I had a company that made Architectural Models. Depending on what the actual materials are you could take digital pictures of the type of material in a stone yard or ceramic tile suppliers then print them up on semi gloss photo paper the image cut into the appropriate size and attach with transfer tape or double sided carpet tape.

I did this for a model that was clad in fireflashed red granite and it worked out very well. Another thing that I did was to overspray a sheet of 2 ply bristol board with various layers of spray paints. I often mixed laquer thinner with houshold enamels to thin them down and then adjust the air and paint levels to either fleck or mist the different colours. After the sheet had dried I cut it up the same as the photos into appropriate sheet sizes to represent the commercial slabs. By cutting up the painted sheets and mixing up the scale sheets one avoids the homogeous look of painting a scibed sheet.

I used this technique on 217 place in downtown Denver, and I used prisma coloured pencils to colour up the pavers in the street that has I M Pei"s building The road was sprayed with a heavy dry texture, then scribed then over textured with the coloured pencils very lightly. That might work for your building also.
Hope this is of some use.
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