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Pet (it's all Ralph and Gerry's fault)

Posted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 2:53 am
by michael
So today I was cleaning up the office looking for my airbrush, its in a box somewhere. There are three canvas sheds full of s#^* and I haven't found it yet. I spent an hour sorting brass scrap, bits of tube and all sorts of other off cuts. I emptied one cupboard hoping I had stashed the airbrush in the back, to no avail. I did however stumble on the Gn15 loco box..... aaah it was like christmas all over again.
First thing I plucked out was a Percy chassis that had been partially butchered. :roll: In the manner of an addict I was overcome went rummaging again through the brass bins and so....

There it is then

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Crew comes to mind.

I go to the library to find the book that Gerry sent.

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Thinking about Ralph's recent adventures... I found it......I was doomed..again :wink:

Posted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 8:40 am
by Rockley Bottom
Go for it Michael :!: :!:

Ralph

Posted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 5:24 pm
by michael
A little more butchering to remove the rest of the unwanted plastic.

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a]I pulled the additional shafts out and the last gear that just drags on the drive train.

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b]removed the extra plastic.

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c] cut the brass tube to length.

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Now comes the tricky part fitting the tube.

Posted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 6:09 pm
by michael
Fitting the tube was not as difficult as I thought it would be, a razor saw was used to cut the section out of the tube. I suppose I could have bent it from some sheet, however the tube was handy and it was 1 inch in diameter. Pets boiler over all is 2 feet so it worked out perfectly for 1/24th scale.

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I needed to relieve the tube a little by the motor so as not to short out the contacts.

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Posted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 8:31 pm
by Glen A
I'm glad I'm not the only person who goes out to the shed with one task in mind.
And then ends up doing something completely different. :roll: :lol:

Posted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 8:38 pm
by Matthi205
WOW!How are you getting such a proccess rate??? :D

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 4:41 am
by steerngo
Progressing well Michael, look forward to the end loco, are you doing a tender/match truck to go with the loco?mainley used for couplings & chains.

ken

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 5:00 am
by michael
Ken I am going to make a small cast iron truck similar to the one on the cover of the Crew Works book.

a]The wheels are filled with some knead mix epoxy putty, not the greatest job in the world But I decided that the wheels could be a bit grungy.

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b]a coat of olive drab was floated onto the wheels I was looking for some grey but couldnt find any, later maybe.

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c] \to gain some weight I made the end caps about 1/4 inch thick easier to hold in the lathe as well. also marked out the end plates on a strip of 2 inch x .020thou brass.

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d]trial assembly of the end plates to get an idea of the massing, these are just rough cut at the moment I still need to cut open the hole for the coal bunker at the footplate end.

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Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 5:03 am
by michael
Sorry Matthi205 I did not answer your question, I am semi retired and steal a lot of time to play. I also work in spurts, as some on this forum already gnow. :roll:

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 8:07 am
by Rockley Bottom
Great spurt Michael :!: . I always like to mock up locos and wagons in a quick and cheap form to get the feel of the outline and also the mass when bits are put together in 3D.
That is where my figure ruler comes in to play :wink: :wink: .
I like the filled in wheels, they look so much more NG railways

Ralph

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 8:08 am
by gfadvance
Up to your usual high standard I see Michael.

Always enjoy your spurts of work, bit like that myself but not to your standard of craftsmanship. There is something about using metal to represent metal which really works - look forward to seeing this one develop .

Going to find photo of prototype, sure I have seen it on the 7/8ths site !

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 10:26 am
by Matthi205
[quote="michael"I am semi retired and steal a lot of time to play[/quote]
I steal a lot of time too to play,and I steal it from school :D :D :D ...

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 4:38 pm
by michael
Ralph, I had originally thought about doing this with styrene I have been wanting to do this loco for some time. and finding the bit of brass tube sort of sealed my fate :wink:

Eventually I would like to do it in 1 1/2" scale and make it live steam.

Gordon, in the January 2008 Tome Pet was the featured loco. I started a drawing for that issue but ran out of time at the time, this might spur me on to finish the drawing as well. Dave Westall took some great pics at the museum in York.

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Matthi Don't steal too much time from school, education is a very valuable asset.

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 5:08 pm
by Rockley Bottom
Michael
Thought that I recognised that shape :idea: :idea: I was looking at some pics I took of it the last time I visited York.

Side by side rivets could be impresive. :!: :!:

Live steam...... that is a challange.

Ralph

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 5:22 pm
by jameswaterfield
Taken at the NRM a couple of years ago
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Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 6:19 pm
by dieselwater
To the shed and back. A really interesting spurt of a project. Got me glued... great modelling as usual Michael.

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 6:41 pm
by michael
James, thanks for that shot of the backplate. I was wondering why the rivets were round on the bottom of the firebox hole, and after studying the pictures in the crew book again, and with the description of the firebox operation I realized that the bottom half was in fact open.

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 8:55 pm
by jameswaterfield
A few more pics
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Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 9:12 pm
by michael
Thanks again James these are really great. I realized while mucking around with the experimental bit of 5 thou brass that is was almost the right size. so I rebent it to get a better idea on the loco.

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You wont beleive this but I actually started to count the rivets, there are 48 across the bottom of the tank. It would be fun to actually have the right number. :roll: Am I completely loony or just warped.

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 9:26 pm
by gfadvance
Michael did you use your "pet" sorry :oops: rivetting tool here?

(rivet counting :!: the drawing shows 41 ........... sorry couldn't resist and I'm sure there are 48 on the real one I just havn't counted them :wink:)

Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 10:04 pm
by michael
Hi Gordon Yes I did in fact use it, I found it yesterday while looking for my airbrush, found the airbrush too.

On the close up in the Crew book plate 39 opposite page 48 there are indeed 48 rivets.

I had to make a new anvil and punch to get the right size of rivet, but that is ok it just adds to the collection of rivet sizes that I can punch.

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Posted: Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:53 pm
by Rockley Bottom
Nice rivets

Any chance ...some time of a few more pics of the rivet punch, that looks a neat bit of work

Ralph

Posted: Sun Nov 08, 2009 12:00 am
by scott b
Good thing it was not on page 140 8)
What was the upper opening for? looks like a bread oven. Cool little beast though, lots of charm.
As usual love to see your build pics always pick up something from them.

Posted: Sun Nov 08, 2009 12:55 am
by michael
Hi Ralph, here is a side view it is gloued up out of some scrap plex that I had kicking around. The arm is 1 inch thickand the base is a couple of layers of 1/4 inch white plex. The punches are just 1/4 inch diameter bright mild steel, I use for styrene and thin annealed brass so the punches work fine the big brass handle is threaded 1/4 x 20 and fits on all the different punches basically just different ball sizes at the pointed end.

The brass anvils are made from 3/8th diam and sepped down to 1/4 diameter on the bottom side, and the top varies with the rivet size.

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The stop is 1/4 inch clear that has been frosted with emory cloth and slides bad to allow the sheet to be positioned exactly where you need it.

The punch just drops into the brass bushing and returns buy virtue of the compression spring.
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A couple of shots showing the way the anvil is used to regulate the spacing of the rivets.
a]the first rivet is pressed
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b]the rivet is then indexed over so the the first rivet is pushed up to the outside diameter of the small raised area of the anvil, then the second rivet is pressed and so on. Because the small raised portion is circular the sheet can move in either direction. When I work on an arc or a circle I have been following ink marks on the brass and do it freehand.
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The next shot shows the anvil and the pressed rivets.
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I did publish a very simple rivet press for styrene in and early Tome

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I hope this helps.

Posted: Sun Nov 08, 2009 1:02 am
by michael
Hi Scott the "oven" on the top was a coal bunker and the driver evidently only stoked up the boiler when the loco was stopped. Because it was so small a footplate the driver stood beside the loco and he could reach in and load a small shovel. The water tank was underneath the coal bin and was filled from a tube between the pressure gauge and the rear of the loco.