(F) Another experiment for stonework

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Steve Bennett
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(F) Another experiment for stonework

Postby Steve Bennett » Tue Oct 11, 2005 1:12 pm

As my quest to improve my architectural modelling abilities continues, I suppose the search for a way to represent stonework has become a little like hunting for the holy grail. I have attempted the scribing into a layer of DAS modelling clay and this method, just doesn't work for me. I came across a product at the weekend which has distinct possibilities and couldnt wait to give it a try. Last night I knocked up the shell of a small hut (4 1/2" by 2 1/2") from some thin card (the backing sheet from a pad of paper) and got stuck in. This is the result so far:

Image

The product, is a textured paint from scenic specialists Green Scene (sorry, those outside the UK are unlikely to have heard of them). The paint is really thick, similar in consistancy to white glue and has very fine sand(?) particles suspended in it. Once dry, which takes about 15 to 20 minutes, this stuff is rock hard, but can be cut with difficulty with a knife.

Surprisingly, it also sticks to styrene and is almost impossible to remove from it when dry. It is water based and can be thinned down, which will be worth experimenting with later. I applied this paint in a similar way to my previous experiments with cobbles, with the pointed end of a toothpic and unlike using white glue, this paint doesn't appear to shrink as it dries.

Also by applying more than one layer, quite a thickness can be built up. I only applied one layer and in places this is up to 1mm thick. Once dry, it will accept washes of water based paints very nicely, not quite as porous as plaster. I did try a quick test with a couple of washes of very thin poster paint which you can see in front of the pot in the pic below:

Image

To get in really close (160kb) try this:

http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b120/stephenbennett/2005-10-11010lge.jpg

To cover the two walls shown, took about two hours, not quick, but I think with more practice it will get quicker and for me at least, it is a lot quicker than using the DAS method. More on this as I progress further with it.
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Postby MOG » Tue Oct 11, 2005 3:45 pm

Interesting Steve ... reminds me of stuff you can get in the wargames world ... Basetex ... although it is quite coarse in comparison. There is a product called Reptex (I think) which is specifically for this sort of purpose ... stone etc. Basically acrylic paint with a fine texture to it. I think it is 'Colour Party' that makes these.

I'll be watching this thread with interest with pending rebuild of Tuther End in mind.
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Steve Bennett
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Postby Steve Bennett » Tue Oct 11, 2005 3:48 pm

Do you think this would be ok to make stone setts/paving slabs?


I would think so, not sure about quicker though. On the positive side, it is possible to apply it to a card base which could be pre-cut to fit between the rails and worked on at the comfort of the workbench, rather than directly onto the layout. The paving slab idea is an interesting one. As this stuff sets, the surface cures first and it would be possible to press it flat before fully setting. I think it should be feasible to lay a large area on a sheet of card, then when dry, cut it into individual paving slabs. You may well be able to find a better colour than the concrete that I used, there are I think eight different colours in the range, Green Scenes will be at ExponNG in a couple of weeks, might be worth picking John's brains for ideas then.

One thing I wouldn't recommend for this stuff, is to lay it as a ground surface between rails in the hope of carving out the flangeways after, it sets too hard for that.
Steve Bennett

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Postby Steve Bennett » Wed Oct 12, 2005 12:25 pm

Update time. I finished applying the stonework to the walls last night and put in the mortar this morning, not sure it is fully dry yet, but enough to take some pics. Here is a shot of the rear for a change, not sure it will ever get looked at though:

Image

And of course the front for comparison with the before pic:

Image

The mortar course is simply a wash of fairly thin white poster paint applied over the complete wall. As the cardboard absorbs the moisture, it sucks the excess off the stonework, leaving only a few random traces on the surface of the stones. The next stage will be to apply some very subtle colour to the individual stones tonight.

I think I was wrong about this technique getting faster with practise, although it could just be that there were more stones to do on the second two walls, as there are no window or door openings. I did find a couple of ways to make it go better though.

First off was to change the music I was playing, out with the Folk, replacing it with some good driving Rock music, that made things feel a lot better. More seriously though and I wish I had thought of this before, was to stop using a wooden toothpic, replacing it with a plastic one. I didn't have a plastic one to hand, so put a point on a length of 2mm Evergreen styrene rod and what a difference it makes. Instead of having to coax the paint off the toothpic, it just flowed off it.

This would work equally well when using white glue as in the previous experiments with cobbles. Andy, Mike and anybody else experimenting with these techniques, give this a go, I think you will be surprised at the difference it makes. I hope this has been of interest.
Steve Bennett

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Postby terrystrains » Thu Oct 13, 2005 11:05 pm

Green Scenes website is:

http://www.green-scene.co.uk/

They will send items abroad. Hope it helps.

Terry


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