Attempting to scratch build

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kf4mat
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Attempting to scratch build

Postby kf4mat » Mon Jul 18, 2011 7:52 pm

Okay, Since I am going to finally get around to building a layout I thought I would give making a small building a shot. The base structure is just corrugated cardboard and I am going to try a wooden siding material, clapboard I guess it's called.

It is an 8 foot by 10 foot 1:22.5 scale shed, as shown in the pictures below I have a piece of paper simulating a roof but to me it is way too flat. As I am not a carpenter by trade how does one determine the correct pitch for a model roof? In more technical terms from the top plate (sill??) of the building how high should the peak of the truss be.

On mine it is only 1 scale foot and then only because I guessed.

Thanks,

Tom

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Image

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Postby More_Cats_Than_Sense » Mon Jul 18, 2011 8:26 pm

When I built my shed/workshop, I put a very shallow pitch on it (6 inches in 4 feet) on purpose; it was to stop the cats from rolling off it when they slept on it :mrgreen:

My storage shed has a nearly flat roof with only a 4 inch fall in 10 feet, deliberately I might add :wink:

A good start on the model by the way :D
Last edited by More_Cats_Than_Sense on Mon Jul 18, 2011 8:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Jul 18, 2011 8:29 pm

Looks fine, just looked out the window and my garden shed has a similar pitch to it. I'm not going out to measure it as it's pouring with rain and getting dark :)
I dont think there is a set angle it should be :?: but you will find that they generally get steeper in areas of high snowfall to shed the snow which can get heavy.
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Postby greengiant » Mon Jul 18, 2011 9:54 pm

Tom
This may help its a picture of my previous work shop at my old house the width of which was just under 8 feet (the shed that is not the house).

Image

This is the inside of my new workshop which is 12 feet wide, you should be able to work out the pitch from these pictures.

Image

I would have gone outside and measured but it is chucking it down :(

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Postby Gavin Sowry » Mon Jul 18, 2011 10:42 pm

:shock: Looks similar to the shed I designed and built... 15 deg minimum pitch for the roof..... and here, it's fine and sunny, and the middle of winter 8)
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Postby kf4mat » Mon Jul 18, 2011 11:46 pm

Okay gentleman, appreciate the input! Of course now I'm left wondering if I didn't jump the gun; it might be better if I had put the strip wood siding on before gluing it up into a box. It seems to me I wouldn't have to cut the wood to exact length as I will if I stay where I am now.

Guess I haven't lost much if I start over, some cardboard, glue and bits of wood in the corners. Never scratch built anything so the learning curve is mighty steep. Who the heck am I kidding, this is my first anything when it comes to model railroad building. I just refuse to be normal and start with a ready to run HO set, it also explains why I like Morse Code.

Martin when you dropping by to put that shed in my back yard? :lol:

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Postby michael » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:21 am

Hi Tom
the roof pitch of the shed is determined by a standard formula they are
3:12 shallow
4:12
6:12medium
8:12
12:12 45 degrees
14:12
16:12 steep

where the first number is the rise and the second number is the horizontal distance.

A common slope is 4:12 or 6:12
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Postby kf4mat » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:33 pm

michael wrote:Hi Tom
the roof pitch of the shed is determined by a standard formula they are
3:12 shallow
4:12
6:12medium
8:12
12:12 45 degrees
14:12
16:12 steep

where the first number is the rise and the second number is the horizontal distance.

A common slope is 4:12 or 6:12


Thanks Michael I will put this info in my notebook for future reference.

Tom

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Postby kf4mat » Sat Jul 23, 2011 8:35 pm

Finding out things are not as simple as I thought. I began siding the walls with strip wood.

Image

Lesson one, building the sub-structure was a bad idea, and I should have waited and put the siding on before I built the box. As seen in the above photo I ended up taking things apart. :x

Second and probably more important is that I don't know what type of wood this is, but I can tell you it is next to impossible to cut with an xacto knife. Really bad choice on my part next attempt will be made with Balsa wood as at least I know I'll be able to trim it to size with out aggravating my crippled right paw.

I guess you don't learn if you don't fail so I should be grateful and not too annoyed.

On the unexpected result side of the coin this strip wood might make my cross tie search finished. The pieces that I trimmed off of the wall are a scale (well close enough anyway) 6" wide and 3' long. Not that thick but most of the tie would be covered by ballast and soil anyway.

Tom

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Postby Gerry Bullock » Sun Jul 24, 2011 8:03 am

kf4mat wrote:
Second and probably more important is that I don't know what type of wood this is, but I can tell you it is next to impossible to cut with an xacto knife.

Tom

I never cut such hardwood with a knife merely deeply score both sides then break into two pieces. Should break cleanly, though you might need two back & forth moves.
Then just clean up the "fuzz".
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Postby Steve Bennett » Sun Jul 24, 2011 9:44 am

If you have problems with one of your hands, Balsa would be a lot easier to use Tom.
I know a lot of people in railroad circles think it is inferior to strip wood, but I'm not one of them, preferring it for almost every task.
Might be a few useful tips for you in this thread:
http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?t=1242
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Postby kf4mat » Mon Jul 25, 2011 5:25 pm

I always try to do things the hard way I guess, but now I know don't cut, score and snap.

Thanks for the tutorial on the fence Steve!

Tom

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Postby Willow Creek Traction » Sat Jul 30, 2011 7:42 am

kf4mat wrote:I just refuse to be normal
Then you indeed have come to the right place :D
Glad to see you giving this a go; amazing what can be done with cardboard and sticks with a dose of ingenuity.

Roof pitch looks fine.

On buildings with cardboard sub-walls it is my normal practice to do the siding boards after wall assembly. With guidelines drawn on wall before assembly. Lines do not always have to be for every board, just spaced every so often to help keep boards aligned vertical or horizontal.

Maybe it will be a help to see in-progress shots of how someone does it with the same materials :?:
Here are some buildings I've done the way you are doing yours.
They have sat stalled for a couple years while I've been working on other things.

Gn15 pasteboard factories
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dwm440/sets/72157607062836721/

Upscale to Gn15 of IHC HO kits
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dwm440/sets/72157617471411439/

Card and balsa outbuildings
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dwm440/sets/72157618284446426/
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Postby Central GnU Yorker » Thu Aug 04, 2011 2:03 am

If I need to cut a bunch of strip wood pieces to the same length, I stack about six at a time and wrap them with tape, then cut the whole thing with a razor saw.
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Postby kf4mat » Thu Aug 04, 2011 11:34 pm

[quote="Willow Creek Traction
Maybe it will be a help to see in-progress shots of how someone does it with the same materials :?:
Here are some buildings I've done the way you are doing yours.
They have sat stalled for a couple years while I've been working on other things.

Gn15 pasteboard factories
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dwm440/sets/72157607062836721/

Upscale to Gn15 of IHC HO kits
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dwm440/sets/72157617471411439/

Card and balsa outbuildings
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dwm440/sets/72157618284446426/[/quote]

Wow very nice work :shock: Sorry it took me so long to respond, I got stuck in Connecticutt when the power steering pump went out on the truck. Since I didn't have the money to have it repaired at a garage I had to teach myself how to replace it. Not a fun last couple of days. :evil:


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