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Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 6:17 am
by Zoange
very nice work :P :P :P

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 12:40 pm
by Ian-IoM
Thanks,

I’ve done a smidgen more weathering, and I think that’s about it:
Image

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 12:50 pm
by chris stockdale
Ian-IoM wrote:Thanks,

I think that’s about it


Not so much 'it' as 'IT'. That's splendid work.

bestest

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 3:47 pm
by Boghopper
Just one three-letter word: FAB!

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 10:11 pm
by Rockley Bottom
Great work with the weathering, as they say"little is more". It shows up the edges of the engine very well.

I was at a railway show on Saturday and saw the Faller road system working, with the lorries following a wire set in the road..

I feel tempted :roll: :roll:

Ralph

Posted: Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:28 pm
by Adrian
G'day Ian

That is, indeed, a true work of art. :!: :!: :!:

It was nice to follow its growth from a pile of plastic bits to a superb model.

Thanks for sharing.

Posted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 6:46 am
by Artizen
Go on - you know you want to now that you have proved that modelling is such good fun!

http://www.mzr-online.com/hobby/NPKW.htm

Posted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 6:49 am
by SteampunkDave
Excellent work. I have enjoyed following your progress.

Posted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 10:05 am
by Steve Bennett
Fantastic Ian, the finish is spot on.

Posted: Mon Oct 03, 2011 3:33 pm
by Ian-IoM
Thanks all :D

Ralph - I’ll look forward to seeing a working autotruck putt-putting round Smithies… :wink:

Ian – Blimey, that’s a bit small :shock: I think I’ll give that a miss :roll:

Anyhoo, on the autotruck the weathering just consisted of a bit of mottling with a slightly different shade of the green base coat using a bit of sponge, a bit of well thinned muck colour run into corners to pick out the detail, and the odd spot of rust colour. For outside edges likely to get knocked I mottled some rust colour using a bit of sponge then gave the corners a swipe with a carpenters pencil. The idea was to give an impression of bare metal where the edges get scuffed, then a hint of rust showing before the paint colour takes over on the flat bits. Fairly simple but turned out ok I think, suppose I’d betted get a bit more done on the quay next, the ground is still a bit lacking…

Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2011 5:29 am
by DCRfan
Simply brilliant stuff. Now are you going to convert it to run on rail :P

Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2011 7:40 am
by Little Andi.
Very VERY good................ Innovative and original. I really enjoyed the SBS and applaud your ingenuity and insight.

I find myself at a loss to fully express my enthusiasm for the way you work and for how you achieve it .............. simple superlatives are not enough.

GREAT JOB.

Posted: Tue Oct 04, 2011 11:11 pm
by Ian-IoM
Ummm :oops: :oops: :oops: , thanks Andi. I'm flattered to see that you like what I'm doing and it’s good to see that you are still around - your models are always inspiring and I’ve learned a lot from your postings, I'm hoping to see more of your work on the forum :)

Ok, the autotruck is about done and I was thinking of getting on with the quayside layout but temptation has arrived by way of a heads-up on a really nice subject for some more plasticard bashing, so what to do next? Decisions decisions :roll: :lol:...

Posted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 5:49 pm
by Adam Roper
I am seriously impressed with this model.

The only major issue is that it seems to be coil sprung at the back - the real thing isn't sprung at all....

My truck made a 25 mile trip in one day when we moved house - quite a scary experience

Posted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 6:19 pm
by gfadvance
Adam,

think you have just been unlucky .............. while there were un-sprung types you get 2 different versions, at least, of leaf springs on the back axle plus the version with twin coil springs.

The more I model in this era the more I have come to the conclusion that all "mass produced" items were in reality almost built with what was to hand so the variations are almost endless.

Trying to sort out a model of a Holt / Caterpillar 2 ton crawler and every picture shows some different !!!

Posted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 6:25 pm
by rue_d_etropal
Gordon
The more I model in this era the more I have come to the conclusion that all "mass produced" items were in reality almost built with what was to hand so the variations are almost endless.


That is the justification for doing just what we want to do. If if is physically possible then we can model it. Even if the originally built machine had certain features, it used to be much more common for machines to be modified during their life. It wasn't such a throw away society then.

Posted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 10:59 pm
by Ian-IoM
Adam Roper wrote:I am seriously impressed with this model.

The only major issue is that it seems to be coil sprung at the back - the real thing isn't sprung at all....


Thanks Adam,

I'm not sure of the springing details really, I tend to model with a fair dose of making it up as I go, but I did look at
http://www.railtruck.org/ quite a lot while making the model and thought it looked like some models had coil springs at the back, I could be wrong though.

Glad you like the model though. I've only seen one in real life, in the Lakeland Motor Museum in Cumbria so am not not that familiar with the real thing, a 25 mile trip on one sounds fun though :D

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 5:45 pm
by Adam Roper
My truck definitley has two lumps of chanel section and nothing else!

I can send some pictures of the brake rigging if you like - it would be quite easy to model.

I think Lister built to order so that you could have whatever you wanted - the locos are much the same. Officially all diesel locos are RM but I think quite a lot of late type R Listers were diesel from new...

R is Railtruck, RM is Railtruck Modified - the key change seems to be the use of the Morris 1000 clutch rather than the engine.

RT is Railtruck Twin cylinder

RMX is Railtruck Modified Electric start

On diesels number 1, 2 or 3 tells you how many cylinders there are

Electric start is great on a cold morning......

Does anyone know what LDG stands for? Because I don't....

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 6:41 pm
by Ian-IoM
Hmmm, I've had another look at railtruck.org and I think I got the spring idea from a lubrication drawing for the P type chassis but looking at the chassis spec it says the rear axle is firmly mounted to the frame :oops: (I suppose I could claim it was a custom model, those setts on the quay look pretty bumpy :roll: )

Thanks for the offer of the piccys, but to be honest I think I'll leave the model as it is. I looks ok sitting on the layout and it's not all that obvious that what's underneath is a bit lacking.

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 7:57 pm
by david colley jnr
Hi all, there is a video of our Lister Autotruck running here and around the 48 second mark, you can see the twin coil springs depicted so lovingly (and well) by Ian. The first of our Autotruck's is the earlier petrol version and that too has the double coils. The petrol one was also built as the tipping version.
Dunno if this helps anything, but the model does look spot on, just a bit too clean ;)

David

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 8:05 pm
by david colley jnr
Also, the LDG's seem to have an angular front end, as opposed to the LD1's and 2's which have the round front ends.

David

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 9:11 pm
by Hans H
This was most impressing model work, hats off to You,
a masterpiece :shock:

Cheers
Hans