Transfers and lining

For discussion of the issues faced when building a model or layout - how to replicate wood, what glues to use, exactly how much weathering can a Gnat take, a good source of detailing accessories - you get the picture, I'm sure.

Moderator: GnATTERbox Moderators

User avatar
Thorness
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 228
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 9:24 pm
Location: Wirral,UK
Interests: Small gauge railways, photography

Transfers and lining

Postby Thorness » Fri Oct 26, 2012 8:43 pm

Has anyone got any experience of using the water-slide or dry-rub off transfer papers that you can buy for use with your computer printer?

Cheers

Don
Don

Thrubwell Hall
R/C is the way to go.

thtroll
True GnATTERbox
True GnATTERbox
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:09 am
Location: London, Ontario
Interests: On30, On18, Gn15

Postby thtroll » Mon Oct 29, 2012 5:51 pm

Don, I have created my own decals using the computer. What printer are you planning on using? Ink jet printers work fine, but the ink has too dry fully. I let it dry for 24 hours. Before you can apply the decal to the model, it has to be sealed. If not the warm water will damage the art work. I can't think of the product I used, but I'll find it and post info. (Decal bonder)
You also have to prep the model. I have found it best to have a gloss paint base. Then use decal set, and allow to dry. You can finish with weathering chalks and seal with a coat of dull coat. Placing the decal on a matte background will show the cutout of the decal.
I'll dig up some info and post as soon as possible.
Try: http://www.testors.com/category/136937/Decals and http://www.decalgear.com/DG/

I keep thinking of thing to add. The decal set is an important step some people omit. The decal set 'softens' the decal so it will sit as close to the model as possible. It also can be used to remove or reposition a decal. Apply and allow it to soak in.
Cheers, Heath.

User avatar
Glen A
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 1311
Joined: Wed May 02, 2007 8:34 pm
Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Interests: Gn15, G 1:24

Postby Glen A » Mon Oct 29, 2012 6:20 pm

I used one of the two products mentioned in the post above.

I tried to doing a yellow lining going on to a red painted loco. The computer printer could not print a bold enough yellow to stand out and be noticed over the red background. It was not noticable and in the end I gave up.
If you are planning a black lining on a light background then you will probably have some success. For a light or weak colour going over a strong or dark background you might be better sticking with the commercialy printed products.

thtroll
True GnATTERbox
True GnATTERbox
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:09 am
Location: London, Ontario
Interests: On30, On18, Gn15

Postby thtroll » Mon Oct 29, 2012 6:25 pm

Don,
Applying dry transfer letters to the decal paper works well also. I used gold letters, sealed and applied with no problems. I look for a photo of the loco and post.
Cheers, Heath.

thtroll
True GnATTERbox
True GnATTERbox
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:09 am
Location: London, Ontario
Interests: On30, On18, Gn15

Postby thtroll » Tue Oct 30, 2012 12:48 am

Here's a couple of shots of my North Ridge Lumber #3 (On30). You can see the decal paper in the first shot due to the flash, but it is very hard to see with the naked eye. They where created by applying dry rub gold lettering to clear decal paper then sealed and applied.

Image

Image

Sorry about the dust and cob webs, she has been sitting on display for far too long.
Cheers, Heath.

User avatar
Thorness
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 228
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 9:24 pm
Location: Wirral,UK
Interests: Small gauge railways, photography

Postby Thorness » Tue Oct 30, 2012 10:30 pm

Thanks for the advice and ideas.

I acquired a sheet of waterslide decal paper at the weekend and have done a couple of experiments using an inkjet printer (HP).

I printed what I thought was a dark orange but as Glen said the dark background comes through and the effect is a black line.

Image

This panel is about 15mm x 5mm as you can see the brunswick green overwhelms the orange!
This is the paper with a clear background. If you use a white background paper I understand that you have to cut out the design to the very edges which would not be easy with any curved bits!

Looks like it could be black lines only.
Don

Thrubwell Hall
R/C is the way to go.

User avatar
rue_d_etropal
Millegniumer
Millegniumer
Posts: 2165
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2005 4:55 pm
Location: Accrington and sometimes France
Interests: France, any narrow/minmum gauge 40cm,50cm , 60cm

Postby rue_d_etropal » Tue Oct 30, 2012 11:28 pm

interesting, background colour had not occurred to me. I bought some decal paper many years ago, but never used it as it seemed a lot of ork. If I as doing it now I would probably use the laser paper as I have access to a top quality laser printer.
There are warnings about which colour paper to use on retail websites, but the pictures shown do make it look easy to say put white writing on a dark background. I can only assume that for, say wagon sides the whole side is produced in the transfer, not just the writing.
I remember reading how to make your own transfers 30 years ago, building up paint then sealing. Sometime computers are not better than doing it by hand.
I presume those transfers/decals used in plastic kits are produced differently, as must be the transfer sheets available for railway modellers(HMRS).
Only way to produce more complex designs which are difficult to cut out, would be to create background to match surface colour. With weathering the join would be less obvious.
Maybe this is why I prefer narrow gauge and other run down railways.
More likely to need something for cars, vans and lorries.
Simon Dawson
(Simon D.),
Narrow gauge Francophile interested in 1m, 60cm,50cm , 40cm and smaller gauges . Build in scales from 1/6th to 1/24th. Also 1/32nd and 1/35th using 16.5mm track to represent 50cm and 60cm gauges.
http://www.rue-d-etropal.com

Cross Kitter
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 212
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 12:23 pm
Location: The Duchy of Cornwall, Just to the west of England
Interests: G Scale

Postby Cross Kitter » Wed Oct 31, 2012 12:13 am

Hi All,

Commercial Transfers are done by screen printing which uses oil based ink so that it is opaque. There is the ALPS printer, some details here. http://www.alps-supplies.com/

And also found this forum post about someone doing white ink. http://www.britmodeller.com/forums/inde ... opic=45423
I hope that is of some help.
Simon the "not at all cross"-kitter.
I'm looking for that decrepit look. What, I just need to look in the mirror?

Mitch
'boxer
'boxer
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed May 23, 2007 8:24 pm
Location: Northampton UK
Interests: Railway modelling, 1/1200 Ship models, Photography

Postby Mitch » Wed Oct 31, 2012 8:23 pm

I wrote a piece about DIY decals for the Tome issue 9 back in 2007. My inkjet printer died a few months ago and I never got round to replacing it. I've now bought a colour laser printer which I'm starting to experiment with. It's quite ridiculous, but I found a Samsung colour laser, brand new and complete with toners, on Amazon, for less than £60 (delivered).

My stocks of decal paper are all for inkjets but they get fried in a laser printer. Don't ask how I know this. If you're tempted to try using a laser, make sure you buy laser decal paper.

In theory, the laser should be much better as the ink is sealed onto the decal paper during printing, meaning that there's no need to coat with protective varnish. The decals should therefore be thinner and more durable and in overall terms, probably a lot cheaper to produce.

You can find the Tome stuff at http://tome.gn15.info/09_November_07.pdf
John Mitchell

thtroll
True GnATTERbox
True GnATTERbox
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:09 am
Location: London, Ontario
Interests: On30, On18, Gn15

Postby thtroll » Thu Nov 01, 2012 7:37 pm

Mitch, I hear you about frying paper in a laser printer. I experimented using 5 mil styrene in mine. The result was better than expected, but don't try to run a sheet though twice, that's all I have to say. I used the left over backing sheets from the fondant icing sheets for the printer. (The thickness of a piece of paper and made of styrene.)
Cheers, Heath.

User avatar
Thorness
GnatterBox Centurion
GnatterBox Centurion
Posts: 228
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 9:24 pm
Location: Wirral,UK
Interests: Small gauge railways, photography

Postby Thorness » Sun Nov 04, 2012 11:29 pm

Here is the finished article printed as black lines.
A Smallbrook Columbine with a few minor alterations.

Image

Image

I'm reasonably pleased with the results for the vast outlay of £1.60 plus a bit of printer ink.
It would be nice to use a multicoloured line but I can imagine wasting a lot of prints while trying to cut out the design accurately if the white background paper has been used. I went through several worksplates (printed on photo-paper) during the cutting out process.

Just need to lay some track and build some stock now!!!

:D
Don

Thrubwell Hall
R/C is the way to go.

thtroll
True GnATTERbox
True GnATTERbox
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2012 1:09 am
Location: London, Ontario
Interests: On30, On18, Gn15

Postby thtroll » Mon Nov 05, 2012 1:06 am

Trying to be critical, can't see decal paper outline, they line up nicely, and the black shades match. Beautifully done.
Cheers, Heath.


Return to “Modelling Matters”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: backwaterscotland and 14 guests