Waterley Bank Estate Farm o the Waterley Bank Estate Railway

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Waterley Bank Estate Farm o the Waterley Bank Estate Railway

Postby WaterleyShunter » Mon Jan 28, 2013 11:43 am

The setting:

Anyone familiar with The Archers will know all about the county of Borsetshire. If you look at the map you will see that in the bottom left corner there is a town called Waterley Cross. Few know, however, about the Waterley Bank. This steep escarpment rises to the west of the town (just off the edge of the map) and leads up into hill country.

For many years most of the land on the Bank has been owned by the Tredegar family, who have long lived in the Hall upon the Bank. In 1890, the tenth Lord Tredegar, inspired by reading Sir Arthur Heywood's 'Minimum Gauge Railways' decided to build a 15in gauge railway to serve the Estate. The surveying and planning was undertaken by Heywood and his agent Mr G D Scott, and some equipment was supplied by Heywood. However, due to the scale of the project (the Waterley Bank system is considerably larger than that at Eaton Hall) it was nescessary to employ contractors to construct the line, while the locomotives and much of the rolling stock were special orders from large industrial concerns where Lord Tredegar was able to exert influence as a shareholder. Thus the appearance and character of the line proved quite different to Heywood's other lines. Indeed the Waterley Bank line more resembles Sand Hutton than Eaton.

Over the years, many changes have occured. Much new stock has been built in-house to replace the aging originals, internal combustion machines have taken over from the steam locomotives, and VHF radios have replaced block tokens.

The model depicts the railway as it is today. The exchange sidings with the Big Railway at Waterley Cross were removed many years ago but the core of the network is still in use for internal Estate transport on the 'it works so why change' principle.

Dimensions of the scenic section are 5ft by 1ft 1in and the section is made up of two boards that box together for storage and transport. The trackplan is a simple Inglenook that has already given many hours of shunting fun. The scene depicted is a set of sidings serving a small mixed tenant farm just outside the Hall grounds.

Here is the first picture. I must confess that it is several months old, and, what with one thing and another, I have barely taken any photographs of subsequent progress. This will soon be remedied however.

Image
Last edited by WaterleyShunter on Mon Apr 29, 2013 6:33 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Postby chris stockdale » Mon Jan 28, 2013 12:31 pm

That's a good back story Daffyd. Plenty of room in 5' x 1' to 'let yourself go' with the layout as you add scenery and buildings.

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Progress

Postby WaterleyShunter » Mon Jan 28, 2013 6:03 pm

Here are the most recent pictures, taken Dec 2012.

Sorry the pictures are so fuzzy :oops: , the lighting was very poor (ordinary room lamp with no natural light :x ). They should give a good idea of progress however.

Image

A general overall view to compare with the first picture. As you can see, from left to right the trains will appear out of the woods, cross a cattle stop into a field, run over the yard points, on past the farmyard (there will be a fence between the front track and the other two) and dissapear through a hole in the sky :? (oh well). From the points, a couple of sidings run into the farmyard. One serves the Dutch barn while the other will be used to hold waiting wagons. There will be a crane on the stone storehouse/barn to lift things in and out of the building and the farmyard will be fenced off with a working gate for the trains. The rest of the farmyard will be on the background between the two barns. The field through which the trains run will be seperated from the crop field on the backscene by a hedge.

Image

A close-up of the stone barn/storehouse. The barn is made from an old shoebox clad with egg-box stonework. The roof is card with Scalescenes O-scale slates printed out at 175%.

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Postby ian holmes » Mon Jan 28, 2013 6:30 pm

Shaky pictures or not. That is looking really good. Looking forward to seeing more progress.

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Postby Si » Mon Jan 28, 2013 7:54 pm

Looks great so far - nice and 'earthy'

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Postby WaterleyShunter » Tue Jan 29, 2013 10:20 am

Si wrote:Looks great so far - nice and 'earthy'


This is down to my method of landscaping, which replicates the natural formation of real ground. First the bedrock is laid down (baseboard surface and polystyrene/clay forms), :arrow: then the lower soil mulch (mixture of plaster, PVA and paint), :arrow: then the topsoil (dark earth scatter), the last of those only where the ground is to be fairly bare (such as in the woods). Most of the surface is currently at the lower soil mulch or topsoil stage.

The addition of plant life will follow the same pattern of mimicking natural sucession, first the tiny groundcover plants, :arrow: then grasses, :arrow: then small bushes, :arrow: then large bushes, :arrow: then small trees, :arrow: then large trees. Hopefully building up the scenery after the manner of nature will make it look more natural.

Oh, and thanks for all the positive comments guys. :D

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Postby Glen A » Tue Jan 29, 2013 6:53 pm

Nice job with the layout (and barn).
Looks like you have a hole in the back board behind the barn window. Are you planning to put details inside it or something?

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Postby WaterleyShunter » Wed Jan 30, 2013 3:51 pm

Glen A wrote:Nice job with the layout (and barn).
Looks like you have a hole in the back board behind the barn window. Are you planning to put details inside it or something?


Thanks Glen. :)

The hole in the backscene is beacuse I am building a working crane to lift thing in and out of the barn. The hole is for the operator to swap the boxes around and take them on and off the crane hook. There will be one of those plastic flap curtain things a little way behind the doorway to allow this to be done out of sight (story is the curtain is there to stop pests getting into the store-room, which would present a health hazard as produce is packed for transport there).

Currently I am trying to adjust the crane runner so that it will run smoothly inside the main beam. :x

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Postby ian holmes » Wed Jan 30, 2013 4:22 pm

What are you building your crane out of?
I built mine out of various evergreen styrene sections
http://iholmes.com/pages/whinnylane/wl05.html

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Postby WaterleyShunter » Wed Jan 30, 2013 4:38 pm

ian holmes wrote:What are you building your crane out of?
I built mine out of various evergreen styrene sections
http://iholmes.com/pages/whinnylane/wl05.html

Ian


As it happens, I based my crane on that at Whinny Lane. It is pretty much the same design. I have made the main beam out of two scraps of plastic micro-channel glued together with a piece of umbrella rib for the slider. The slider now slides smoothly but the rope (string) will not pass through the slot in the bottom of the beam when it isn`t under tension - it is slightly furry and gets caught. :x I will have to try a different sort of rope (string). Any ideas on how to make the hook :?:

And here comes another question. I plan to display the layout at exhibition stood on a row of supporting boxes (which will also be used to store the stock) atop one of those standard utility tables that exhibition organisers usually provide. Trouble is, I don`t know what height to make the boxes to ensure the layout is at the right height because I don`t know the height of the table. :? Would anyone happen to know this dimension (measured from tabletop top to floor) :?: I should think that the height is pretty much universal. :roll:

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Postby ian holmes » Wed Jan 30, 2013 6:40 pm

A good design then.. :D
On my crane I ran the cable inside a square section of tube that I slid along the inside of the channel created by the two girders.
The hook was just a piece of wire shaped and topped off with some milliput crudely shaped like a counterweight. On reflection I should perhaps have put some fishing weights in the milliput for extra weight, that would have make the cable run smoother.
Lets not get on the subject of layout height ere are too many opinions.. :lol: I like layouts mounted at a good height (i.e. 50" off the ground) lately I have taken to mounting my layouts on top of a APA box on the tables supplied by the exhibition. It's a bit lower than 50" but it feels OK to me. Others will differ and that's their right.

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Postby rue_d_etropal » Wed Jan 30, 2013 7:27 pm

Table height is normally around 30in, and that height is fine for me, but as Ian says everyone is different. Maybe we should be using top of layout not bottom as a reference point, as a small scale layout only 6in high can look better set at a higher level.
2 thoughts just come to me. First is that when we are putting up pictures at an art exhibition it is the top edge which is used as a reference point. Secondly I remember reading about best levels for shelving in supermarkets, and it was found that the height everyone expected to be best(and therefore costing more to have your goods displayed) was not the case. Unfortunately can't remember which height was best. Will try to find the report.
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Postby Adrian » Thu Jan 31, 2013 12:04 am

G'day Daffyd
The slider now slides smoothly but the rope (string) will not pass through the slot in the bottom of the beam when it isn`t under tension - it is slightly furry and gets caught. I will have to try a different sort of rope (string). Any ideas on how to make the hook


Just a few thoughts ---- instead of 'string' try using small chain. Falls into place easer than rope/string. Obtainable from model shops or jeweller's shops.
For the last hook I made I used a short length of brass bar and cut and filed a hook from that. Did most of the filing during the adverts while watching TV --- only took one evening. To the hook I added a fishing weight and a pulley in a sheath (obtained from a model boat shop). The combined weight of the brass hook, fishing weight and pulley made sure that there was always sufficient tension to hold the chain taut.

ImageImage

An extra advantage of using a pulley at the hook is that the hook does NOT twist on its way up and down making it easier to hook onto things without the 'great hand in the sky'.

Image

Trouble is, I don`t know what height to make the boxes to ensure the layout is at the right height because I don`t know the height of the table.

Don't worry too much about it !
It doesn't matter what height you choose some will say its too high and some too low. Choose a height that suits you. My preference is about 2'-6" to 3'-0" (80-90cm) from floor to track base. At this height its just right for me when sitting on the bar stool that I take with me. Using the bar stool means that I am at a good height to talk to the customers (most of the layouts that I display are autonomous and so don't need much attention to keep them running.)
Just remember you can please some of the people all the time or all of the people some of the time but not all of the people all of the time.

Hope that this helps rather than hinders.
Cheers
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Postby KEG » Thu Jan 31, 2013 10:40 am

I think you cannot really compare super market displays with model railway exibitions.

Studied the akcohol department yesterday. They place the expensive stuff right in front of my nose, while the cheap booze is almost on the floor.

While at the fruit and vegetable corner, goods were displayed mainly at standard table height, so I could get a large picture of coulours and variety. They even use special lights and a mist of water, to give the impression, the goods came in right from the field or tree.

For most exibition visitors it is more comfortable, if the displays are closer to their eyes. 4 to 4,5 feet above the ground.
But this means, folks exibiting have to bring their own tables or shelves plus lights. This is not always possible, due to restricte transport capacities.

Have Fun

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Layout height

Postby WaterleyShunter » Thu Jan 31, 2013 4:40 pm

Thanks for all the advice. :D

After much messing about with a tape measure and lots of guesstimation, I have concluded that the best height for the layout is about four feet, possibly a bit less. This is to strike a balance between not having it so low that people are looking over the backscene and have to awkwardly half-bend-down to see better :evil: , but not so high as to have the trains at eye level,which would make any discrepancies over-prominent :oops: . A sort of slightly lower than first floor / rather low-flying bird viewing height. Taking the table height as 30in, this will mean boxes around 15/18in high. Not as small as I might perhaps like, but not overly large.

Must admit I did not think of chain, Adrian. Now I think about it, chain may also be more prototypical for a heavily-used crane. Also, scale chain is easier to securely attach a hook to because it can be soldered onto the chain. It must be secure. I think I can get some from hereabouts. Is there any particular type or grade of fine chain recommended?

Did a lot of shunting last night with the new fiddle yard attached (pictures to follow) and everything ran very well :P (though a couple of wagons do waddle).

Now to go and do some modelling - a whole field of grass (hanging basket liner) to plant and a hedge to make once I find that coir matting.......

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Postby KEG » Thu Jan 31, 2013 6:15 pm

I happen to have a link on some exibition pictures from last weekend.
All layouts were at standard table level, most pictures taken from the same camera angel.
http://www.ig-modellbahn-schkeuditz.de/menue/winterfest2013/wf2013.htm

So that seems to be the way, a visitor sees the layouts. Flying 200 Feet above them. seems to be standard, but not very interesting.

Here is a small layout I have seen in Paris at Railexpo 2007. The shallow layout is approx . 5 feet above the ground.


Image

The onlooker can very comfortably enjoy and see the details.


Have Fun

Juergen

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Postby Adrian » Fri Feb 01, 2013 1:23 am

G'day Daffyd

Regarding the chain I think that the length that I used was from Walthers or maybe MicoMark. But certainly not sure. Over the years I have accumulated yards of the stuff from all sorts of places :!:
I read into your remarks that you intend for the hook to be connected to the chain directly ?
If you plan to actually intend to try and use the hook to pick up 'things' might I suggest that you use the pulley and sheath as I did. This has the advantage that the hook is not able to twist and it makes the 'hooking' of the 'thing' that much easier.

Regarding the height of the layouts. The main thing to think of is who is your target audience :?:
For my layouts I like to think that they are 'adult' themes that kids can enjoy.
This is why I tend to display at about 2 1/2 to 3 feet.
It is easier for adults to bend rather than having to lift the kids up, (especially if there is more than one kid).
Its also a good height for those who are wheelchair bound.

But this is a problem that will be argued about till the cows come home as there is no one height which will make all people happy.

Cheers
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More developments

Postby WaterleyShunter » Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:26 am

More progress. :D

A couple of coffee-stirrer wagons have been finished.

Part of the field has been planted with grass.

One of the points has been ballasted.

The topsoil in the woods is finished.

The posts of the farmyard fence are in place.

Painting of the rails has begun.

Work continues on converting a Bachmann Davenport.

Pictures to follow.

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Postby DCRfan » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:01 am

KEG wrote:Here is a small layout I have seen in Paris at Railexpo 2007. The shallow layout is approx . 5 feet above the ground.


Image

The onlooker can very comfortably enjoy and see the details.


Have Fun

Juergen


I really like that display height but I can almost hear the swish of the tape measures of Display Height Police flicking out :wink:
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Postby KEG » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:28 am

Christopher Payne´s layouts are quite popular all over Europe:

Image
(Picture taken at Utrecht, Ontraxs 2011)


He even gets paid for showing them. I think one of the reason is, the audience actually has a chance to study the details at approx 4 1/2 feet exibition height.

Have fun

Juergen

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Loco progress

Postby WaterleyShunter » Thu Feb 07, 2013 11:32 am

Here are some pictures of my progressing Bachmann Davenport conversion. :) As you can see, I've kept most of the original bits. Unable to decide between open and full cab, I decide to make it a 'convertible'. The top part of the cab is a drop-on (actually its rather more fiddly than the word 'drop' would imply :? ) secured by a pair of 'lip' plates. Thus in fine weather the driver can enjoy the sunshine and summery breezes, while in wet and cold weather the driver can keep out of the rain and wind. :P

Image

With enclosed cab top fitted.

Image

And with cab left open.

You will gnotice that there is no back panel on the cab. Partially because otherwise it would get extremely cramped and pokey in there with the roof on, partially to satisfy H&S requirements that all railway locomotive driving cabs have at least two exits, and partially because I just like the look of this feature. :)

Is this the first Gn15 'convertible critter'? :?:

You may also gnotice the first painted rails and in the foreground the grass is beginning to grow. That white brick marks the fouling point where the farm sidings meet the main line.

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Postby ian holmes » Thu Feb 07, 2013 11:55 am

Is this the first Gn15 'convertible critter'?

My LKM NS1 that I built 4 years ago has a removable cab
http://iholmes.com/pages/gn15/workspages/lkmns1.html
I'll have to see if I can take a picture of it with the cab roof off. I did find it the other day when looking for stock for the new layout.

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Progress

Postby WaterleyShunter » Wed Feb 13, 2013 3:56 pm

More progress. :)

About half the rails are now painted.

More grass has been planted.

Nothing really worth a photograph yet though.

Have completed some wagons, will take their portraits soon.

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Wagon portraits

Postby WaterleyShunter » Wed Feb 20, 2013 3:46 pm

As threatened :mrgreen: , here are some portraits of the wagons completed/nearly complete thus far.

Image

A bogie flat made out of coffee stirrers on an old 00 coach chassis. This one is big by ordinary Gn15 standards, two or three Sidelines kit wagons can fit comfortably aboard. It was built to be the length of two ordinary Waterley Bank wagons to make shunting more challenging. :twisted:


Image

Here are some humbler wagons. The van is a Sidelines kit with rain strips added over the doors, the tub is a Sidelines kit too, and that Top wagon on the right is built from plasticard and wire on an old 00 wagon chassis using the dimensions of Heywood wagons in Mark Smithers book. It is the first piece of Gn15 equipment I ever made :D , and so sets the standard wagon length for the railway. As per the real thing, the top is removable (with great care :? ).


Image

Gnot satisfied with one unusually large bogie flat, I just had to go and build another :roll: . There are a few differences, such as the use of balsa as well as coffee stirrers (think I should have stayed with coffee stirrers for the solebars :evil: ), the length (it is a bit shorter), and the design of the retaining strips. In front is another common four-wheeler, built using yet more coffee stirrers and balsa, on another old 00 wagon chassis.

Oh, by the way, the bold/nail/other fixing head detailing is made by the simple expident of prodding in the right places with a sharp pencil :idea: .

Gnotice also the dull brown rails and the gruffy grass.

Bought a Minimum Gauge Models loco body kit recently to go on the BR 04 chassis from the old 00 layout, but this project must wait its turn until the Hornet is finished.

Churz,

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Loco progress

Postby WaterleyShunter » Mon Mar 04, 2013 4:08 pm

I have trimmed the cab on the Davenport conversion as it just seemed too tall and out of proportion.

The Hornet is now cleaned up and awaiting warmer weather to enter the paintshop.

This weekend I was busy assembling that Minimum Gauge Models body kit. This was my first etched brass kitbuild and surprisingly easy. It only took a few hours to get to near-completion. (Kit was glued rather than soldered). I must say that the manufacturers have done an excellent job of designing and etching the kit, no faults anywhere, very simple to build, looks great even with little detail, and above all, extremely plausible looking, exactly the sort of thing that might come rolling out of the Alan Keef Ltd works any day now. I could almost swear that I've seen one rambling up the Eskdale, or climbing through the woods at Perrygrove.

Here are both 'cabbed critters' posed together:

Image

That tanker at far right is a Playcraft item with all the obviously HO bits removed. Gnot sure why a tanker would be needed here, but it adds variety.

Gnotice also the concreting now down in the yard. Sorry about the barn legs, they just keep moving about all the time, and cannot be glued in place yet.

Layout progress is slow at the moment due to coursework demands, but is still on-going.

Gnext up is more scenery, stock needs proper surroundings to run through.

Anyone recognise those boxes in the barn?

Churz,


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