Waterley Bank Estate Farm o the Waterley Bank Estate Railway

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Progress

Postby WaterleyShunter » Mon Mar 18, 2013 10:27 am

More progress. :D

Image

More grass planted, fence posts glued in place and a backscene put up at the far end. I will be making the fencing from wire made out of those plastic net bags that supermarket oranges come in. The backscene is a photograph from the farm where I sometimes work, reversed and rebalanced. I rather like the way the track sweeps across the field.

Image

A panorama of the vast expanse of the ineffably complex and gigantic control panel. The switches allow locos to be isolated on the siding ends.

Image

The gate is now operational. It is mounted on a thin rod adjacent to the post and is opened and shut by turning the rod. Opening and shutting the gate adds a whole extra dimension to operations.

What is that guy in the blue overalls doing? Suggestions are invited.

Churz,

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Re: Progress

Postby More_Cats_Than_Sense » Mon Mar 18, 2013 12:17 pm

WaterleyShunter wrote:
Image

What is that guy in the blue overalls doing? Suggestions are invited.



Is he wondering who turned the building upside down? 8) :mrgreen:
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Postby Gerry Bullock » Mon Mar 18, 2013 12:51 pm

He's wondering whether the boxes contain Zippos, Zaffiro's Pizzas or Zest Soap.
So little time, so many ideas!!!!! GerryB.
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Website

Postby WaterleyShunter » Tue Mar 19, 2013 11:24 am

I have now set up a website for the Waterley Bank Estate Railway. The link is on my signature.

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Postby WaterleyShunter » Wed Apr 03, 2013 4:44 pm

I recently bought one of the 1:32 Models Sand Hutton wagon kits but I was not at all satisfied with the chassis, so combined bits of it with an old incomplete 00 wagon kit, some scraps of wood and plasticard and some leftovers from my Sidelines Hornet kit to make this wagon.

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I think I will make the buffers deeper. By the way, that there lever is a brake.

I am working on a farmyard backscene to go between the two barns, pictures to follow.

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Postby Narrow gauge Nutter » Thu Apr 04, 2013 8:26 am

Sorry to be dense, but who's 1:32 Sand Hutton wagon? :oops:
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Postby WaterleyShunter » Thu Apr 04, 2013 9:35 am

Narrow gauge Nutter wrote:Sorry to be dense, but who's 1:32 Sand Hutton wagon? :oops:


The 1:32 Sand Hutton wagon kit made by 1:32 Models, 1:32 Models is the name of the company. The kits are made by a man called James Coldicott. Look for www.james-art.com. Though made for 1:32, the kit looks pretty good in Gn15. It is a mixture of resin castings for the body and a cast whitemetal chassis (which is why I did not use the supplied chassis parts, I don't like whitemetal. :evil:)

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Postby WaterleyShunter » Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:20 am

The Hornet has now been painted and very nice it looks too. :) I don't intend to do any weathering except perhaps making it a bit grubby from going a few days without being cleaned. Locomotives on the Waterley Bank Estate Railway are always well cared for.

Behind it you can see the first attempt at the farmyard background. Unfortunately I got the colour balance wrong and so it looks too yellow. :( I will have to alter the colours and print another. Gnotice also the (nearly) finished field. Now only the bank to the left of the barn needs grassing, to be done once I have made the hedge.

Image

I recently bought a couple of Schleich calves to inhabit the field. Soon there will be more, of a different breed. As is correct for the (modelled) time of year, they have been weaned but are not yet mature (once they are, as they are bull calves, they will go to make burgers. :twisted: )

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Hedging

Postby WaterleyShunter » Sat Apr 20, 2013 8:42 am

I am now making up a hedge to go along the rear of the field to separate it from the wheat field on the backscene. The hedge is made using dried garden groundcover plants glued onto a card backing prior to being covered with leaves. At the moment it looks like this.

Image

I made a gate in the hedge from strips cut from an old venetian blind slat. Sanding all the varnish off the slat was a very dull job. WARNING; be careful if you do this, the sandpaper and slat both get burning hot very quickly from all that abrasion.

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Still a lot to do on both.

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Davenport Roof Height

Postby on30critter » Sun Apr 21, 2013 3:34 am

Nice work on the critters and layout. So what is the height of the Davenport roof now after trimming it and how is it attached to the chassis?

Mike

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Re: Davenport Roof Height

Postby WaterleyShunter » Sun Apr 21, 2013 8:47 am

on30critter wrote:Nice work on the critters and layout. So what is the height of the Davenport roof now after trimming it and how is it attached to the chassis?

Mike


The Davenport's roof is now 69mm above the footplate. The body is attached to the chassis by the three pre-existing securing points on the bonnet moulding (one tab extending from the front panel down through the footplate to be held in place by the front coupling and two robust protrusions on the back panel that clip around the end of the gearbox housing), the cab being attached to the bonnet. The cab top is only a drop fit and if you try to pick the loco up by this, the cab top will just lift off.

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Postby on30critter » Mon Apr 22, 2013 2:03 am

Thank you for the info. I quess I should have asked about the columns on the back of the cab. What are they made from and are they just sitting on the footplate?

Mike

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Postby WaterleyShunter » Mon Apr 22, 2013 8:12 am

on30critter wrote:Thank you for the info. I quess I should have asked about the columns on the back of the cab. What are they made from and are they just sitting on the footplate?

Mike


The support at the rear of the cab is made from a piece of round spue from a plastic model kit, and yes, the bottom end is just sat on the footplate, the top end being glued into the inside of a corner of the roof 'frame'.

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Onward ever modelling onward......

Postby WaterleyShunter » Fri May 10, 2013 9:26 am

No.8 delivering supplies to the farm.

Image

With the scenery all coming into place, this area at least is now looking how I planned it, little trains on track surrounded by grass running through the field with the cows. Though judging by the condition of the grass, the cows have been away for a while and have not been back long.

The Dutch barn has been considerably re-jigged.

Image

Why? Well, to be brief, it just didn't look right in its original form. The biggest problem was that it was looking pretty much impossible to effectively hide where it met the backscene. Also it protruded too far to the left and made the gap between the barns too small. Its still only 21 (scale)feet between the barns, though this is not a problem as I don't imagine any road vehicles would need to turn around right up at the end of the yard. They could easily reverse in or out. (Gnow there's an idea. Model the rear end of a Land Rover, van or similar in low relief to depict the transfer of goods between railway and farm vehicles.)

I recently dug out this old 1/34 scale truck.

Image

I have some notion of using it for a 'critter bash'. Any ideas how?

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Postby WaterleyShunter » Wed Jun 05, 2013 9:20 am

I was originally intending this vehicle to be a passenger coach. Its made out of plasticard with the upper works and roof from two Gnomy toys.

Image

Then yesterday one of the upper bits came off. Whatever the plastic that Gnomy use actually is, it certainly doesn't like to join with other kinds. :evil: (Anyone know a glue that will make it REALLY stick?) :?:

But with a couple of bits of sprue for pillars, it has become a brakevan. A sort of GWR Toad derivative.

Image

Still got a lot more to do on it. Has anyone any pictures or diagrams of the apparatus inside a typical brake van?

I would also appreciate suggestions as to where I can get some scale corrugated iron for cladding the barn. I have investigated the metal products but these would make the barn much heavier. Weight is very important here as the whole layout needs to be light enough for one or two people to carry.

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Postby Oztrainz » Wed Jun 05, 2013 9:51 am

WaterleyShunter wrote:I would also appreciate suggestions as to where I can get some scale corrugated iron for cladding the barn. I have investigated the metal products but these would make the barn much heavier. Weight is very important here as the whole layout needs to be light enough for one or two people to carry.


Hi Daffyd,
others geographically closer can suggest where you might get one - use a Friskars crimper used for cardboard/paper craft to roll your own out of old soft drink cans. Cut the top and bottom of the can off and slit the side to give you a flat panel of metal. Cut the flattened can sides to make your long side 8 or 10 scale feet long and your short side about 2.5 to 3 scale feet. Feed your sheets through the crimper, flatten the sheets out after corrugating and spray with the colour of your choice. Yes it turns out metal corrugarated sheets that are close to G scale that don't weigh a lot.

There is plenty of stuff that has been posted over the years on this already. Use the Search functionality for "Friskars" or "corrugated" for a start. You might be surprised at some of the other methods that you might turn up. :wink:
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Postby Artizen » Wed Jun 05, 2013 11:23 am

I made my corrugated sheets from cardboard. Remember that back in the old days (pre-1970s or so) a sheet measured 6x3 feet so the builder could carry them up to the roof. Elf and Safety weren't so strict back then and besides, the long-run machines hadn't been invented.

I made a jig out of florist wire suitably spaced - glue one, miss one, glue one, miss one, etc. Make two so they interact and squeeze wet cardboard between them. Buy the coloured stuff from a newsagents so most of the work is already done for you. A typical sheet had eleven corrugated ridges with one and a half ridges overlap. Don't forget the lead head nails! If I had a photo account somewhere I could post a photo.
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Postby Simon Andrews » Thu Jun 06, 2013 8:27 am

Like the coach Daffyd, clever idea to use the Gnomy parts.

Simon.
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Postby WaterleyShunter » Thu Jun 06, 2013 10:59 am

[quote="Simon Andrews"]Like the coach Daffyd, clever idea to use the Gnomy parts#

Simon##/quote#

Gnot my idea actually ( :oops: ), I was inspired by Giles Barnabe's version#

http://www#gn15#info/img?pic=gb_futtocks_end1

Thanks to John and Ian for the advice about the corrugated iron. A Fiskars crimper is now on order.

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Postby Les » Thu Jun 06, 2013 12:50 pm

Daffyd,

If you soak ordinary corrugated cardboard in water, the glue dissolves and you are left with the inner corrugated bit which, after pegging on the clothes line to dry (don't worry about what the neighbours think :D ) makes excellent corrugated iron. I've used this many times, most recently on my "P. Moreau et Fils" layout for the corrugated iron clad industrial building:- http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?t=7242. Corrugated cardboard comes in different "gauges" too, so you can vary the size of corrugation to suit what you want.
Les

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Leaves

Postby WaterleyShunter » Sat Jun 29, 2013 7:22 pm

Thank you to everyone who contributed advice about making corrugated iron. The crimper has arrived and I have started to experiment with methods of making corrugated iron sheeting for the barn.

So now I am progressing to making some trees for the layout, using pieces of rosemary bush as the armatures. (A part-made tree is in the background in the last photo.) I have collected a quantity of dried peppermint leaves and fern fronds to provide leaf material, and, following recommendations on this forum, purchased some artists ink to colour the leaves.

But I've no real idea how to ink the leaves. Place them in a tub with some ink and shake it? Dip them into a beaker of ink? Attach them to a tape and paint the ink on with a brush? Any suggestions would be most welcome.

I would also welcome any advice on large-scale tree-making in general.

Thanks in anticipation,

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Postby Willow Creek Traction » Sun Jun 30, 2013 3:17 am

Les wrote:... which, after pegging on the clothes line to dry (don't worry about what the neighbours think :D )
Oh, once they have heard you make model trains, all manner of things can be gotten by with as "Oh, it's nothing, he's just one of those model railway eccentrics." :lol:

:arrow:
WaterleyShunter wrote:(Gnow there's an idea. Model the rear end of a Land Rover, van or similar in low relief to depict the transfer of goods between railway and farm vehicles.)

:idea: :shock:
Model enough of it to allow packages placed in the bed - make operting tailgate which can be opened and closed from behind the backscene - have means to remove and replace loads in truckbed from behind backscene when truck tailgate is closed.
later, Forrest Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality. -- Nikola Tesla, July, 1934

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On we go

Postby WaterleyShunter » Sun Jul 14, 2013 7:25 pm

Progress on the layout continues slowly. I'm making some barbed wire for the fence by cutting plastic net bags used for supermarket orange packaging into strips and spraying them with grey primer. After comparing my fence with some real ones I have concluded that the posts are unnecessarily close together, but re-doing the posts is now prohibitively difficult, so I will let it be. Both gates have been reworked to make them look more realistic, using actual prototype pictures this time. It has taken four attempts to make the large gate convincing.

Meanwhile, after much experimenting, I have decided to use Tetri-Pack material as the material for corrugated iron for the barn. It even shines like real corrugated iron!

I am building a new wagon for the layout, pictures to follow. I am very pleased with how it is progressing.

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Modifications and progress

Postby WaterleyShunter » Wed Aug 14, 2013 9:01 pm

I haven`t posted about the layout for a while because I decided to concentrate on doing some modelling instead of gnattering about it.

First up, the fiddle yard track was relaid from three tracks to one because I decided that instead of having rolling stock standing by on unpowered tracks it was better just to sit them on a flat surface. This change means the powered track is now straight, which makes it much easier to use.

Image

Next, the rail ends on the outer ends of the scenic boards were lengthened and soldered to copperclad sleeper strip so as to have them flush with the board ends to attach the fiddle yard. No photo of that. This was followed by much wiring work to connect the fiddle yard to the rest of the layout and prepare the wire ends at the board ends in order to fit connectors. For the time being, jump leads are still used. These developments mean the layout is now fully operational in the proper format. Extensive testing followed, including of the ability to run two locos, during which tests I took this picture.

Image
Once the Davenport has headed off into the woods with supplies for the kitchens of the Hall, the Hornet will go out onto the main line and push its single wagon off through the fields in the other direction to deliver some vegetables to other Estate tenants along the line.

I changed the farm backscene to another image from my local farm, which looks more appropriate and also better matches the colours of the layout. I also began, after days of experimenting, to clad the Dutch barn.

Image

I am cladding the barn using large panels which will be marked with lines to represent the joints between individual sheets. I chose this method because:

1/Experiments with individual sheets were frustrating because using very thin materials made sheets that were impossible to glue together without ruining the corrugations, and using thicker materials exaggerated the joints too much.
2/On many such barns that I have seen, the joints between sheets are not very obvious and a suggestion of joints would seem to be enough.

I enclose a picture of the first panel on the barn, not yet coloured or marked. Does it look sufficiently like corrugated iron?
Image

The majority of work has been focused on the woodlands at the other end, an area which requires much work to get right. Here is an overall view of the wood as it looks now.

Image

The big tree armature is some pieces of rosemary bush. The top part, like the top of most tall things on this layout, detaches to allow the boards to crate together. The smallish trees are Hebe bush twigs with Woodland Scenics foliage draped over to get an impression of what they will look like foliated (its not the final foliage). The saplings are SIST 4mm scale adult trees, ready-made. The stumps are from Sidelines and the roots with the drinking puddle is the baseplate from the pair of Schleich badgers also featured. The front left part is still to be worked out.

Here is a man's eye view of the woods. The man and wagon are put there to give scale to the picture. The wagon is the new one previously mentioned. It has van-height bulkhead ends, open sides, supporting timbers across the top, and the top and sides are covered by a tarpaulin. I do not know what it is supposed to be called.

Image

And finally, a badger's eye view.

Image

Here I repeat my previous request for suggestions of methods of getting the dried fern frond pieces I will use as leaves on some of the trees and plants to take up the ink to be used for colouring them. The leaves seem to be impervious to the ink.

I have also undertaken the 4th rebuilding of the field gate and now it is looking like one. Pictures to follow.

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Postby Trevor Coburn » Thu Aug 15, 2013 8:12 pm

Hi Daffyd,

You're quite right about corrugated steel sheeting, installed properly you cant see the joints. But I think theres a bit missing on your barn.

Real sheets are fixed to purlins , either made from 75 x 75mm steel angle.
with "J" bolts with large ("penny") washers on the out side, like this:

Image

Or to "Z" purlins like these with self drilling screws.

Image

I know this is not corrugated (more like siding) but principle is the same On corrugated sheets the screws should always be on the ridge.

Hope this helps with your cracking layout.

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