Little Kiln

G scale on 9mm track? Are you mad? If so, this is the forum for you.

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demaine22
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Little Kiln

Postby demaine22 » Fri Jul 15, 2011 1:44 pm

A couple of weeks ago I was testing my little Heap layout, shunting a couple of wagons back and forth and found as I switched around watching my little engine bustle about the board, a part of me was just wanting to watch it go off trundling on its own...that coupled with a dodgy 009 point frog sealed the layouts fate...it's now sat in the garage awaiting a new point on order form a local store. I am also straightening out my 3x2 base board as it seems to have sadly warped in the garage leaning against the wall...oops!

To pass the time, I have reached into my modelling fund and bought up a circle of 103mm radius Tomix track. With this I hope to build a small pizza layout, incorporating scenic features of my planned larger model, treating it as both a warm-up to the bigger long-term layout and to use it as a test track to play with my Gnine stock.

Using Tomix track demonstrates it's own merits in previous threads, it's a really simple product to use, and the radius keeps the final layout size down, meaning I can work on it with ease in front of the TV in the evening, and store it up on a shelf when it's not being worked on.

Here is a photo of what I have done so far;

Image

Track is wired, painted and operational, with my engine and stock working extremely well in both directions...no derailments or dramas...almost disappointing :twisted:

The base is layers of corrugated card from fruit boxes, they are surprisingly strong, although of course that is a good thing, I decided to build up some of the land using off-cuts etc, so that the layout had some dimension to it!

All I intend to do now is scatter a bit of grass down...yup, just some greenery as I have not quite decided what I'd like to feature in the centre – I had built a workshop out of balsa...but it's too large for this...if anyone has a suggestion I'd love some inspiration please.

So here we are, getting something...well actually GOT something running in Gnine, just need to make it look pretty now :wink:
Last edited by demaine22 on Mon Feb 18, 2013 10:46 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Postby Simon Andrews » Fri Jul 15, 2011 2:04 pm

Good to see you have something running :D No turning back now. A small shed in the middle is always a good option.

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Postby demaine22 » Fri Jul 15, 2011 2:12 pm

Cheers Simon, it's great to have something going, a nice little hurdle crossed
8)

I found working with balsa to build the workshop quite rewarding too, so a shed could be a good option :)

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Postby Steve Bennett » Fri Jul 15, 2011 2:37 pm

Excellent Simon, great to see you up and running with the Tomix track. Isn't it great for a quicky layout :?: I'm already thinking about starting another :roll:

I like the shape of your base and think there is a lot you could do with it.
As mentioned a small timber shed or shelter is always a good way to set the scale for the scene and nice for somewhere to add detail.
Looking at this though, I think I might go for the right front corner, rather than in the centre. It would balance the raised area at the opposite end :?:

I get the feeling you like derelict and run down, so for the centre, how about the remains of a collapsed building. Just one corner still standing but not full height, with all the rubble lying around it. Add in a few bits of rusty junk with weeds growing through it and it could make a nice little cameo.
Just thinking aloud here, it might not appeal at all :lol:
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Postby demaine22 » Fri Jul 15, 2011 3:05 pm

Thanks Steve, the Tomix track is so simple to work with, I don't blame you for planning another layout, it gets you straight into the scenic part with such little hassle.

Although I like derelict and nasty rotten buildings like this beauty;

Image

I fear I may not be able to pull off something like this...need a bit more practice I think.

I would like to keep the building/mess/overgrowth quite central, as the outside edges look deceptively large in this picture.

Would something like an A frame look out of place? I like the idea of the loco travelling under or through something, just not sure what.

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Postby Steve Bennett » Fri Jul 15, 2011 3:38 pm

:lol: Yes, that building is maybe a bit ambitious and big :wink:

An A frame over the track could work. Possibly a couple of pallets nearby with tarpaulins covering odd shapes to depict what the A frame was there for. Doesnt need to be obvious what they are, then you could make up story to fit :)
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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Jul 18, 2011 1:38 pm

You probably thought I was nuts about putting a ruin in the centre, you were probably right :lol:
Anyway, i had a bit of a play last night and now I think I might use the ideas myself :)
This is quickly placed together and nothing glued, just for a feel of how it might look.
Image

Not too surprising the building fell down, they didnt use any mortar to hold the bricks together :lol:
A bit more debris still required, an odd window frame or bit of corrugated lying around. Plus dirt weeds and stuff like that.
Now I need to bring in a flat wagon and salvage some of those bricks :wink:
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Postby demaine22 » Mon Jul 18, 2011 1:57 pm

Now why can't I keep things simple like that! :shock:

I like this idea Steve, quite effective yet simple to execute, and would give a good excuse for wagons trundling around with scrap bits inside.

The ideas I have had myself so far, is a pile of scrap bits / loco parts (dumping ground for the Heap) or maybe a small log store that is a little in need of a coat of paint...I'll have a sit tonight I think and look at what I can knock up.

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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Jul 18, 2011 2:23 pm

demaine22 wrote:Now why can't I keep things simple like that! :shock:


:lol: I think we all suffer that problem, or maybe we just lack discipline :lol:
I think we are all guilty of trying to fit a complete empire into a small space at some time :wink:

Can see that you have come up with a couple of good ideas yourself, so this was probably not needed, but hopefully it will trigger something in someone else.
I like the logs idea, which I guess is not a surprise in view of my log train :)
It does make for a believable reason for a small gauge railway though.
I'm sure you must have seen Ian Thompson's inspirational firewood train, but if not it's a joy to view.
http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?t=4698

The scrap/salvage theme would work too and could offer up some nice weathering to play with.
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Postby kf4mat » Mon Jul 18, 2011 3:24 pm

Steve Bennett wrote:Anyway, i had a bit of a play last night and now I think I might use the ideas myself :)
This is quickly placed together and nothing glued, just for a feel of how it might look.
Image


Okay, I need to ask, 1.) how did you make those bricks, and 2.) how do you make all those cool plants?

I feel like I'm stuck in the modellers equivalent of the stone age compared to the people on this forum.

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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Jul 18, 2011 4:05 pm

kf4mat wrote:Okay, I need to ask, 1.) how did you make those bricks, and 2.) how do you make all those cool plants?


Well the bricks were the easy part :) They were made of plaster poured into a rubber mould, 16 at a time, cleaned up then stained with dilute acrylic paint.
A bit tedious, but doing small batches at a time isnt too bad.

The plants are made of coloured paper and shaped using punches intended for decorating greetings cards.
You can find a whole lot more about the process in an old thread which gives an almost step by step guide to the process.
Pull up a comfy chair, pour a drink and start from HERE.
Should keep you out of mischief for a while :lol:
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Postby Steve Bennett » Tue Jul 19, 2011 9:13 am

I thought it looked like there were not enough bricks in the ruin, for it to have been a complete building.
This could be why.

Image

Somebody is obviously collecting them to use elsewhere :wink:

Sorry, will stop hijacking your thread now Simon :)
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Postby michael » Tue Jul 19, 2011 2:12 pm

Steve, those are really great looking bricks. How did you achieve the V indent on the top?

Thanks for the link back to Ian's log train it is wone of my all time favourite locos.
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Postby Steve Bennett » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:14 pm

michael wrote:Steve, those are really great looking bricks. How did you achieve the V indent on the top?


I cant take any credit for the bricks, I used a mould from JIGSTONES , though mine came from Back2Bay6 here in the UK.
They are slightly overscale, but when used in isolation like this, it really doesnt show up.
As I also have 1:20.3 figures in the mix as well, the size difference is even less obvious :wink:
I know I shouldn't rubber scale, but I'm having fun :lol:
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Postby michael » Tue Jul 19, 2011 3:33 pm

Thanks, I thought that you might have made your own mould. But why reinvent the "wheel" Brick as they say. I couldn't figure out how to do a strikeout.
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Postby demaine22 » Sat Aug 13, 2011 8:06 pm

Steve Bennett wrote:Sorry, will stop hijacking your thread now Simon :)


Don't worry Steve, hijack as you wish, I find the brick work interesting and I hope to try it in the future.

I thought I'd update with a little bit of progress.

Image 

My pizza has gotten dirty and gained some overgrowth. This is the base scenic work I now hope to build around, and give the layout some personality.

I was not too pleased with my hanging basket liner grass, but otherwise I'm happy with everything else!

Picked up some bits from Mr Bennett today, and I hope to update with something about that soon.

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Postby Steve Bennett » Mon Aug 15, 2011 12:54 pm

demaine22 wrote:I was not too pleased with my hanging basket liner grass, but otherwise I'm happy with everything else!


Have to admit, my limited experience with hanging basket liner has not been that great either, but that could be down to learning how to use it best :lol:
I found small bits mixed in with other materials gave me the best results, but there are some great ideas in the Grassy Track thread that I must try, as I think some might suit my modelling style better. I also get impatient waiting for the glue to dry, before pulling off the excess, which doesnt help :lol:

The great thing with a small layout like this though, is to use it as a test area for new techniques. If something doesnt work, you can always rip it off and try something else. They are ideal for that.
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Postby Jon Randall » Mon Aug 15, 2011 1:19 pm

I found that to get a good looking lawn from hanging basket liner takes a lot of time and even more patience :twisted:
My method was to tease out some strands, roll them gently between fingers to get them parallel, fold the clump in half, cut the folded end flush (I used the scissors on my Swiss Army knife as all my other scissors kept jamming), dip the cut end onto a puddle of pva and glue onto the layout. A clump would only cover an area of about 3mm by 2mm. :shock: When an area had completely dried I then mowed it with my beard-trimmers.:roll: In fact it took about nine hours to cover Tetley Grange :roll: :twisted: :twisted: :shock:
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Postby demaine22 » Mon Aug 15, 2011 1:35 pm

Jon Randall wrote: In fact it took about nine hours to cover Tetley Grange :roll: :twisted: :twisted: :shock:
:shock:

Certainly looks good though Jon, worth the time taken!

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Postby demaine22 » Mon Sep 05, 2011 9:55 am

Hi Chaps,

A small 'rushed' update – promise proper pics next time.

Image

Image

I thought I'd try to green up the place a little, using scatter from Woodland scenics, I can't say I'm totally happy, especially after seeing work like Simon, Bob and Sam's, but it's a start at least, and the good thing with this stuff...is that it mows down really easily and can always be changed 8)

The little wooden structure is the beginning of the centre piece...this will be a nice little log store at the bottom, with some tools stored on the upper part. The next part of the centre piece will be what I believe is called a charcoal retort, but I could be wrong. Simply put this is used to turn the logs to charcoal, this in turn, can be used in the garden to retain minerals and stabilise carbon in the soil...bit of a 'green friendly oomph' if you have a small holding.

Once I have these built and painted I want to return my focus to the ground cover, and some surrounding detailing.
Last edited by demaine22 on Mon Nov 07, 2011 1:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby skylon » Mon Sep 05, 2011 4:52 pm

Nice little centre piece there, I like your ideas for it.

Regarding your ground cover, the scatter you've used would make a good base for further work. Maybe static grass of varying lengths and shades, hanging basket liner or countless other products available! Between working (yeah right) I've been experimenting with some cheap OO gauge tree armatures and various flocks to make bushes.
My greenery is far from finished, but I'm in exalted company there!

Keep up the good work!
Thanks,
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Postby demaine22 » Tue Sep 06, 2011 9:13 am

skylon wrote: Between working (yeah right)


LOl I know that feeling! :D

Thanks Sam, I think I'm going to strip some of the scatter back around the centre to achieve a more 'trodden' area, and as you suggest add some nice tufts of grass and over grown areas around that.

I'm also looking at ideas for presenting the layout - more on that later though...must remember not to get too carried away!
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Postby henrix72se » Tue Sep 06, 2011 9:22 am

It looks great !!

Even if your neglected tracks looks nice, maybe you could add a bit of sand around them, just enough to get a feeling there "once" was some .. :wink: Don't remove the grass between the tracks, it looks great, again, just a "touch of sand" , no more. Just my two cents.

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Postby Steve Bennett » Tue Sep 06, 2011 10:37 am

Great concept with the charcoal burner Simon. wish I had thought of that one, as it is an ideal subject for a small gauge like Gnine.
Quite often, retort kilns for charcoal are little more than an old oil drum, so you shouldnt have too much trouble fitting one, or maybe even two.

I would agree that there is possibly a bit too much greenery on there, it's easy to get carried away :lol:
I would suggest that the next step would be to decide where to put the burners and any other items like log piles. Once you have that you can work out where the natural walkways would appear.
With it being a working area, there would be certain areas where the dirt gets compacted enough to keep weed growth under control :D
Of course, the heat from the kilns would also kill off any plant growth in there immediate area, they pack a lot of heat.
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Postby Simon Andrews » Tue Sep 06, 2011 12:26 pm

Great concept with the charcoal burner Simon. wish I had thought of that one, as it is an ideal subject for a small gauge like Gnine.

Have to agree. Found some links to simple home made kilns. Hope they help.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8PI3VvXyxc&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WIcCd-RSsU&feature=related

http://www.holon.se/folke/carbon/simplechar/stove.shtml

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